holiday box 2015

Holiday Box – November 2015

What’s in the Box:

Celery, Celeriac, Kabocha squash, Delicata squash
Potatoes-Baking, Austrian Crescent Potatoes
Rutabaga, Leeks, Carrots
Mixed beets-Red & Chioggia
Onions. Apples-Pink lady, Kale
Gold Chard, Parsley, Thyme

Today is the first holiday box!  Summer members, you receive this box as part of your 2015 Summer share, and will receive the December holiday box on December 15th.  Please note that no deliveries will take place between November 24th-December 8th

For those of you who have signed up for the Holiday and/or Winter season, welcome!  We will deliver produce Tuesday (tomorrow) to your pick up location.  If you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.  We are happy to talk you through your first pick up!

I have included some of my favorite holiday recipes below, as well as new recipes to try out.

Enjoy!

Heidi

First, check out this article with great celery recipes at Huffington Post:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/07/celery-recipe-raw-braised_n_2536087.html

 

Baked Delicata Squash with Apple Stuffing Adapted from Cooks.com
This is a favorite dish of mine, which can also be found (among many other recipes) at our website:http://www.boistfortvalleyfarm.com/recipesAdd sausage if desired… it’s excellent with or without.

1 large Delicata squash
2 small apples, unpeeled, diced
2 tbsp. diced celery
1/4 cup minced leeks
1/4 cup chopped walnuts
2 tsp. butter
2 tbsp. water
Dash of salt

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Cut squash in half. Remove seeds; place cut side down in a baking dish with about 1/4 inch of water.

Combine apples, celery, walnuts and leeks. Add butter & water. Salt to taste.  Put in separate baking dish & cover.

Bake both for 45 minutes or until tender. Remove from oven and fill squash with apple mixture.

Roasted Root Vegetables with Thyme

A medium mixing bowl of vegetables, scrubbed well and cut into bite-sized pieces.  Consider adding squash, carrots, beets, onions, rutabaga, potatoes…
1 Tablespoon chopped fresh thyme leaves
3 Tbsp Olive oil, or enough to lightly coat vegetables
½ tsp each Salt and Pepper
1/4 cup vegetable broth

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Toss vegetables, thyme, and oil together.  Add salt and pepper and toss well. Place in large baking dish.  Add broth and cover.  Bake 30 minutes, then remove cover and continue to cook about 30 minutes, until vegetables are lightly browned in places.


Kabocha Squash Cake with Brown Sugar Cream

Adapted from: Bon Appétit September 2007 Room 4 Dessert by Will Goldfarb

Brown sugar cream:
1 tablespoon water
1/2 teaspoon unflavored gelatin
2 cups heavy whipping cream
1/3 cup (packed) golden brown sugar
3 large egg whites

Cakes:
2 cups 3/4-inch cubes peeled seeded kabocha squash (from one 3-pound squash)
1 cup whole milk
1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise
Nonstick vegetable oil spray
2/3 cup (packed) golden brown sugar
6 tablespoons safflower oil
1/4 cup lager (mild-flavored beer)
1 large egg
3/4 cup all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt

For brown sugar cream:
Place 1 tablespoon water in cup. Sprinkle gelatin over. Let stand 10 minutes to soften.

Stir cream and sugar in medium saucepan over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Add egg whites and whisk until mixture thickens, about 12 minutes (do not boil). Add gelatin mixture; whisk until dissolved. Strain into large clean bowl. Chill until cold. Cover and chill overnight.

For cakes:
Combine squash and milk in heavy small saucepan. Scrape in seeds from vanilla bean; add bean. Bring to simmer over medium heat. Partially cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer until squash is very tender, about 20 minutes. Remove vanilla bean. Drain squash. Place in processor and blend until smooth. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.
Preheat oven to 375°F. Spray six 3/4cup ramekins with nonstick spray. Place 1/2 cup squash puree in large bowl (reserve remaining puree for another use). Add sugar, oil, beer, and egg to puree and beat to blend. Sift flour, cinnamon, baking soda, and salt over; beat to blend. Divide batter among prepared ramekins.

Bake cakes until tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 18 minutes. Cool cakes in ramekins. Turn out onto plates. Beat brown sugar cream to firm peaks; spoon alongside cakes.

2015_summerweek12

Summer 2015 – October, Week 12

At A Glance:

Spinach
Green Beans
Purple Beans
Yellow Beans
Green and Purple Kohlrabi
Edamame (edible soybeans)
Red Russian Kale
Purple Carrots
2lbs Rose Finn Potatoes
Leeks

Greetings Friends,

The weather today was perfect. There was a fog so thick you could cut it early this morning, which gave way to a beautiful afternoon. I watched most of it go by through the office window as I diligently took care of all the odds and ends, big and small, which go along with any business. I am always grateful for fair weather even if I do not get to enjoy it firsthand. When I am warm and cozy and it is blustery out there I cannot help but feel the sting of guilt, knowing that our field crew is braving the elements to harvest produce for delivery. On a day like today I can almost enjoy the envy I feel, knowing that this same crew is working under reasonable conditions and without the headache that comes with muddy vegetables and stuck field trucks.

As promised, the contents of this delivery are beginning to represent the more savory vegetables that Fall has to offer. Nothing says stew or roast like a combination of leeks and potatoes. Edamame make an appearance this week as well. The word Edamame means “Beans on Branches,” and they grow in clusters on bushy plants which deer LOVE. In East Asia the soybean has been used for over two thousand years as a major source of protein. We can barely get them to finish this far north, and it was quite a feat considering the late start we got this year. If not for this long dry season it would not have been possible. As a snack, the pods are lightly boiled in salted water, and then the seeds are squeezed directly from the pods into the mouth with the fingers-the pods themselves are not edible. If you have not tried them before, you are in for a treat. I think them the pretzel of vegetables; simple preparation instructions follow.

A quick word too on the purple carrots. Purple Haze by name, they are the best purple carrots we have ever grown. They do have an orange core unlike some others, but they also have a great carrot taste, and they grow to maturity without bolting (going to seed), which is saying something if you have ever tried to grow them. We trialed at least three other varieties of purple carrots, unsuccessfully, before finding this one. We just love them, and hope you will too.

Mike

 

 

 

Edamame
Gourmet  | August 1998

Soybeans in the Pod

Preparation:

Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil, add the beans and boil over high heat for about 5 minutes. Just before serving, toss edamame with salt to taste.

Or for a little more zing-
Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes and 2 sliced garlic cloves in a skillet over medium heat, 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in the edamame, some lime juice and salt

Coax the beans out as you would eat an artichoke, by gently scraping the pod with your teeth


Simple Stew

You’ll be surprised how savory and satisfying this simple vegetable stew is! Serve with quinoa, millet, or steamed rice.

3 to 4 servings

1 large bunch of kale
3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
1 medium leek (white and pale green), thinly sliced
1 cup vegetable or chicken broth
2 medium carrots, peeled and thickly sliced
4-5 fingerling potatoes, cut into ½- to ¾- inch cubes
1 low sodium bouillion cube (we like Rapunzel brand)
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Strip the thick stems off the kale leaves. Cut the leaves crosswise into ¼-inch strips.
In a medium stew pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the leek, and cook until softened, about 3 minutes.

Add the kale in 2 or 3 handfuls, stirring to wilt. Add the broth and bouillion and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes.

Add the carrots and potatoes, cover, and simmer until the potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes.

Remove and blend in a blender about ½ the stew then return it to the pot. Stir.  Season with salt and pepper before serving.

Adapted from The Swiss Secret to Optimal Health by Thomas Rau, MD, with Susan Wyler. Berkeley Books 2009.

 

2015summer_week5

Summer 2015 – August, Week 5

What’s in the Box:

Green, purple & yellow wax beans
Sweet onion, Zucchini & Summer squash
Snow peas, Cucumbers, Broccoli
Basil, Peaches
Lilies

Dear Members,

PLEASE TAKE TWO STEMS OF LILIES

I woke to hazy skies this weekend and my first thought was there’s something wrong with my eyes.  The haze settled, almost like mist, which is not completely uncommon for this time of year, but it hovered in the distance, making me wary.  Mike opened the door and looked back warningly at me.  ‘Something’s on fire.’

Right now it feels like everything’s on fire.  I have volunteered as a firefighter for our community for a couple years now, and every day I hope for rain, and wait for the emergency pager to go off.  With so little water, it’s difficult not to be unnerved by the wind and smoke, even if it isn’t near our farm.

As I’m sure most of you already know, over 30,000 firefighters are currently deployed in Washington State, coming from as far away as Australia and New Zealand, trying to stop the progression of the fires.  More than 250,000 acres have burned, and many of these fires are less than 50% contained.  Here are a few resources to keep you updated.  I linked directly to the morning brief for Monday to give you a glimpse of the statistics.

http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/content/products/intelligence/MORNINGBRIEF.pdf
www.dnr.wa.gov/wildfires

http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/firemap.aspx

I am clearly preoccupied by this situation.  Towns have been evacuated and firefighters have lost their lives.  It’s hard to focus all my attention on the farm, even when the season demands it.  The earth is so very dry, and the grass is so much fuel to burn.  We have heard of farms who narrowly escaped fire damage, and those who were not so lucky.

We need rain, and I’m not sure when we’re going to get it.  The first responders have a lot of work ahead of them.

For those of you who have been a part of our farm family for many years, you will know that our home and farm flooded catastrophically in 2007.  Our local grange members opened up the hall to feed our community every single day, for months after the flood, as our community rallied and came together to slog our way through our ruined homes and possessions. Having somewhere to go for a warm meal when we were feeling desperate, defeated, and alone made a real difference in our ability to rebuild our farm. So I am sharing some info about a non-profit group who is helping to feed the first responders in the Okanogan, in case you are inspired to join me in donating:

Soup Ladies http://www.soupladies.org/

Be safe, and be well,

Heidi

2015_may_week1

Winter 2015 – May, Week 1

What’s in the Box:

Austrian Crescent potatoes*, Beets*, Leeks*, Cameo Apples,
Asparagus, Radishes, Turnips, Rhubarb, Shiitake Mushrooms,
Spinach, Thyme*, Black Sheep Creamery fresh cheese
*from our farm, all other produce is organic & NW grown

 

Dear Members,

PLEASE TAKE ONE CONTAINER OF CHEESE!

This has been a tough Spring for us, not weather wise (how could we complain about this gorgeousness??), but rather, equipment-wise.  Two tractors giving us trouble, two sets of disks falling apart, literally, in the field (so much for that weld)… and where on earth is the fertilizer?

In the short-term, we have rented a tractor from a dealership (yes, indeed, a tractor dealer-it’s the shiniest piece of equipment we’ve had on the farm since Mike painted our ’48 Farmall) and Mike is powering through to the best of his ability.  We are blessed to have some amazing folks in our community (Shout out to Steve VanTuyl, who is an outstanding builder/welder, and even talks to us when we interrupt his weekends).  In the challenging times, we find the reasons that we love what we do, and we cling to those things (even if we’re swearing under our breath).  Thanks to all of you for being a reason to love our work!

We aren’t quite full steam ahead yet, but we are on our way.  The greenhouse is jam packed, and we’re anticipating taking the seedlings to the field this week and weekend.  Wish us luck!  And functioning equipment!

Also, I’m trying to post our progress on Facebook from time to time, so if you’re curious, go check it out!

Yours,

Heidi

2015_april_week2

Winter 2015 – April, Week 2

What’s in the box?

Leeks*, Potatoes*, Bunch Beets*, Cameo Apples
D’Anjou Pears, Cauliflower, Curly Parsley*
Swiss Chard, Radishes, Mesclun Salad
Johnson Berry Farms Jam
*from our farm

 

Dear Members,

The weather is glorious here today, the greenhouses are full, and we are busily preparing for your delivery. Despite the favorable weather we find ourselves a bit behind this spring. I have found that tasks expand to fill the time available to complete them, and this season is no different.

The potatoes included in this week’s delivery are stored from our harvest last Autumn. Since we don’t treat them with anything, they tend to sprout eyes; an excellent reminder that we’re eating living food! The sprouts are easily removed when scrubbing your potatoes.

Johnson Berry Farm, what can I say? JJ and Lisa are top notch folks that have continued the tradition of agriculture while the neighborhood around them has exploded with growth. The Johnson’s home farm is located just outside the transition from East Olympia to Lacey, and I was flabbergasted by the amount of traffic as I dodged and weaved my way through the narrow roads to their house, getting lost only once and not too badly. The original farm house has been converted into a commercial kitchen, and the Johnson’s live next door. Another tradition in agriculture is standing around leaning against the side rails of a pick-up truck and talking. This can go on for quite some time, and if seen from the road will draw others. Such was the case when I picked up the jam included in this week’s delivery. I had a wonderful visit with Lisa and JJ and their friend John, missing my dinner date, but getting to catch up on all the goings on.

Johnson Jams are not a certified organic product. They are made with organic ingredients including the Johnsons’ berries and rhubarb. I called this morning when I noticed this, and talked to JJ about why he has chosen to keep this info off the labeling. In short, he intends to certify the product soon and recommended that I go inside and have some toast and jam. He made a good point. What a pleasure to offer an excellent local jam and spend dollars with producers who put out a quality product with integrity: Johnson Berry Farms. http://johnsonberryfarms.com/

Full disclosure: We tried our best to source a local mesclun but when it came down to the wire we had to include a CA product, for this I apologize. I have no real qualm with CA produce, but it just doesn’t belong in our program. We make every effort to shop within 300 miles but, try as we might, we just couldn’t close the gap entirely this year.

 

Enjoy!

 

Mike

coffeeblueburger2

Coffee & Blue Burger with Stout BBQ Sauce

Good things are coming. Good things. For instance… Coffee, beef and beer and BBQ. In your recent CSA share we included a special roast from our friends at Santa Lucia Coffee located locally in Centralia, Washington. We ground up a little bit of that and included it in both the burger recipe and the BBQ sauce today. Along with a little beer of course. I’m sure you’ve all noticed a trend with me and yes, I love cooking with an variety of alcohol. Now lets get started.

The Burger

1lb Quality Pasture Raised Ground Beef (We used our local Heritage Meat)
1/2 tsp Salt
1/2 tsp Black Pepper
1 minced Garlic Clove
4 tsp Ground Santa Lucia Coffee
1/2 cup Crumbled Blue Cheese (We used Rogue Creamery‘s Smokey Blue)
4 Pretzel Buns – split and toasted
Lettuce, Tomato, Onions and any other fixxin’s you prefer

 

The Sauce

3/4 cup Chopped White Onion
1 Tbsp Olive Oil
1/4 cup Molasses
6oz Tomato Paste
1 Tbsp Sea Salt
2 tsp Ancho Chili Powder
2 1/2 cups Porter or Stout beer
1/4 cup Apple Cider Vinegar
2oz Brewed Santa Lucia Coffee

 

  1. If you’re using a charcoal grill, get those things going so your grill is hot by the time you’re burgers are ready to slap on there.
  2. Starting off with the BBQ sauce – In a medium sized pan, caramelize your onions in the olive oil on medium/low heat.
  3. Once your onions are a nice golden brown and caramelized, add the salt and ancho chili powder and stir for about 30 seconds to toast up the spices.
  4. Add your molasses and continue to stir for another 30 seconds.
  5. De-glaze the pan with the Beer and add the apple cider vinegar. Continue cooking on low for about 10 minutes. Feel free to add a little more beer if it’s looking too thick.
  6. Pour the sauce into a blender along with the brewed coffee and puree until smooth. Your sauce is now ready.
  7. Onto the delicious burgers – In a medium sized bowl, gently mix your ground beef, salt, pepper and garlic. Divide the meat into 4 sections and press each into a patty.
  8. On each side of the hamburger patty, sprinkle and press 1/2 tsp of ground coffee on each side.
  9. On a preheated grill (or cast iron pan if you prefer) brush the grates with a little olive oil and grill the patties. For the love of all things holy, don’t press them with the spatula. Please. If you need a refresher course on how to grill a burger visit this link.
  10. Once your burgers are cooked to your liking (medium rare – hint hint) start building your burger on your toasted buns. Add your sauce, fixins and crumbled blue cheese. That concludes our recipe for the day, enjoy!

 

Recipe by: Mirinda @ Boistfort Valley Farm
Butternut Squash soup

Kürbissuppe – German squash soup

A simple soup, perfect for a rainy winter day. The German variation includes apples, parsnips and carrots to enhance the character of the butternut squash. Your recent winter CSA share included some yummy root veggies along with the butternut squash, potatoes and Fuji Apples. We decided to cook them up and turn them into a creamy, velvety comforting soup.

Recipe by: Mirinda @ Boistfort Valley Farm

 

INGREDIENTS
3 medium Butternut Squash
2 Fuji Apples
4 large Parsnips
4 large Carrots
3 large Fingerling Potatoes
1 white Onion
1/4 cup Butter
1 quart Vegetable Broth
2 cups Half & Half
1/2 tsp Ground Ginger
1 1/2 tsp Curry Powder
salt to taste

 

  1.  Preheat oven to 350F degrees.
  2.  Cut your squash down the center and remove seeds. Place face down onto a large baking sheet.
  3. Peel carrots and parsnips and remove the tops. Place on baking sheet along with your squash and put into your oven. Allow to cook for approximately 30-45 minutes (until your parsnips and carrots have a golden, roasted look) Remove your carrots and parsnips and set aside. Place your squash back into the oven for another 30-40 minutes or until fork tender.
  4. Peel and chop your onion and apples and add to a stockpot along with your butter on medium-low heat. Allow to cook until the onions are clear.
  5. Peel and chop your potatoes and add to your stockpot along with your roasted carrots, parsnips and vegetable broth. Cover and let simmer until potatoes and carrots are tender.
  6. At this point, your squash should be done cooking. Remove from your oven and set aside to cool.
  7. When your carrots, taters and those other tasty ingredients in the stock pot are tender, remove from heat and place ingredients into a blender. Puree until smooth and pour back into your stock pot. (You can also use an immersion blender if your prefer)
  8. Remove the flesh away from the skin of the squash and place in your blender along with the half & half. Puree until smooth and add to your stock pot. Return to the stove and allow to simmer on low and stir well.
  9. Add your ginger, curry and salt to the pot.
  10. Your soup is ready to eat! Grab a bowl and dig in!

Summer 2014 – Week 13

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Corn, Kale, Beets, Green Cabbage,
Cherry Tomatoes, Italian Basil,
Garlic & 5 Stems of Sunflowers
Small shares:
Corn, Kale, Red Chard, Green Cabbage,
Beets, Cherry Tomatoes,
Lemon Cucumbers, Italian Basil,
Garlic & 5 Stems of Sunflowers
Family shares:
Corn, Kale, Beets, Green Cabbage,
Cherry Tomatoes, Snow Peas,
Edamame, Italian Basil,
Garlic & 5 Stems of Sunflowers
Please remember to take: 5 Stems of Sunflowers

 

Dear Friends,

Autumn is rapidly approaching. Harvest; harvest season, the Harvest Moon, (tonight), turning a corner, shorter days, cooler nights and mornings, golden light, quiet afternoons with the kids in school, change… You feel it too, right? Forget words. Follow that primordial urge to store the bounty of summer for winter. Can, freeze, dry; a little or a lot. One small bunch of herbs hung to dry in the kitchen, one pint of basil pesto in the freezer, one quart of peppers in vinegar. Just do it. This winter when you look at it, when you taste it, when you can recollect the long days of August without words, you’ll thank me.

Now get crackin’

Reminder: There are still seven deliveries left in our Summer season CSA after today’s. We also offer Fall and Winter deliveries; One delivery in November and one in December, with an eye toward entertaining and family gatherings, and then two deliveries/month January through May. We will be sending out more information in the next week or so and will prioritize our existing customers when filling these programs.

Now seriously, put something up!

Mike

Summer 2014 – Week 2

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Red Lettuce, Green Lettuce, Red Swiss Chard or Kale
Baby Bok Choy, Garlic Scapes, Cilantro, & Fresh Lavender.
Small share:
Red Lettuce, Green Lettuce, Red Swiss Chard or Kale
Baby Bok Choy, Garlic Scapes, Cilantro,
Spring Onions & Fresh Lavender.
Family share:
Red Lettuce, Green Lettuce, Red Swiss Chard or Kale
Baby Bok Choy, Garlic Scapes, Cilantro,  Spring Onions
Spinach,  Strawberries & Fresh Lavender.

 

 

Please remember to take: 1 Bunch of Lavender

Dear Friends,

I would like to extend a heartfelt thank-you to everyone who attended the Strawberry Fling on Sunday. What a splendid day! It was so well attended by such interested and engaged customers and community members. These events and things like it, even the notes I’m writing now, are some of the things I love most about the way BVF conducts business. Though I love the ‘farming’ part of farming; the tractors and the outdoor work and the communing with the powers that be, and though I often envy the simplicity and efficiency of my commodity growing neighbors, I am not certain that I could ever let go of that direct contact with the people we serve. It is so invigorating to engage directly with our customers and share the farm; actually have our customers visit and see what it is we do and how we do it and meet the people doing it. Speaking of the people doing it, wow, did the folks here ever do a great job.

Dear sweet Emily, BVF’s advertising and outreach coordinator was spectacular. Emily handles all our social media and attends events and coordinates with other like minded organizations and individuals. She, on top of an already demanding schedule of motherhood and partnership, pulled off an awesome feast, did all the advertising and printing and purchasing and cooking and serving and clean-up. She enlisted the help of her friends and family and in a humble and graceful manner created an atmosphere that was delightful for all who attended, and allowed me to focus on my role as proud owner and verbose tour guide. Thanks Em.

I have not left much room to go on about this week’s delivery, but… Welcome! And Enjoy! The fields look excellent. We are excited about the CSA this year and looking forward to a great season. These early boxes will showcase greens and other early crops, and will soon include carrots and peas, fennel, broccoli, and so much more. Remember too that we accept customers any time throughout the year and prorate for the deliveries that have been missed. If you enjoy the program let your friends and coworkers know! There is no better way for us to reach more people.

Mike

Winter 2014 – March, week 1

What’s in the Box:

Carrots*, Parsnips*, Leeks*, Red Cabbage, Curly Kale, Crimini Mushrooms, Red Delicious Apples,
Sunchokes, Mixed Fingerlings, Yellow Onions, Daffodils, Black Sheep Creamery Cheese.
*From our farm

 
PLEASE TAKE 1 CHEESE & 1 DAFFODIL BUNCH!

Dear Members,

It is a foggy morning here at the farm.  With these longer days, the “spring forward” of Daylight Saving Time, and the realization that everything seemed to get greener last week, I’m pleased to remind you that spring will be here around the time you receive your next box!  Although we are still in winter right now, it is quite exciting to be able to provide our first splash of colorful flowers to your share this week with these cheerful yellow daffodils.

In light of the tough early winter weather which really impacted our greens, in particular, this week we have opted to extend outside of our normal Washington and Oregon region to bring you some red
cabbage and kale from California.  We have thought long and hard about reaching that far out of our region to supplement our CSA and we hope that you enjoy this bit of green.  We look forward to incorporating more locally available greens in upcoming boxes.

A few notes on what is included in this box: We have also included Sunchokes in this box.  The recipe I have added below is one that looks delicious and I, myself, am looking forward to trying!  The cheese included from Black Sheep Creamery is “a fresh, sheep-milk ‘cream’ cheese.”  Tart and tangy, it will keep in the fridge for 2 weeks.  Brad told me that on Friday, it was grass waiting to be eaten, by Saturday it was milk waiting to be given by the sheep, and by Sunday it was being made into cheese. Enjoy!

Kathryn