Mexican Green Beans

Ejotes Guisados (Mexican Green Beans)

A simple, spicy and flavorful dish that pairs quite well with almost any meal. And by almost, I mean it that it probably won’t go too well with your morning cup of coffee and bowl of cereal. If you’re looking for something a little less spicy, just cut down the jalapeno to one (or less if your peppers are spicy). My peppers from the garden weren’t too overly spicy this year so I went with two… and I like it spicy.  Removing the seeds in your peppers will also tone down the spiciness.   I added honey at the end to balance out the lime and the spice but you can also use a little bit of sugar if you would like to keep the recipe vegan.  Enjoy!

Ejotes Guisados (Mexican Green Beans)
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Ejotes Guisados (Mexican Green Beans)
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Blanch green beans in a large stock pot of well salted boiling water until bright green in color and tender crisp, roughly 3 minutes. Drain and place in a bowl of ice water to stop from cooking. Set aside.
  2. Heat the avocado oil in a large skillet set over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until translucent.
  3. Add jalapeño, poblano, garlic coriander, salt and green beans. Stir until well incorporated. Cover and allow to cook for about 5 minutes or until beans are tender but still bright green.
  4. Remove from heat; add tomatoes, mexican oregano, lime juice and honey. Stir well and serve immediately.
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meatloaf leekloaf

Meatloaf Leekloaf

Meatloaf, smeatloaf, double-beatloaf. I hate meatloaf. We’ve all had our remarkably awful memories of a family members dry and dreadful meatloaf.  Admittedly, it took some time for me to hop on the meatloaf wagon due to severe childhood scarring. Meatloaf can really be delicious… if prepared properly. I decided to make an alternative recipe with the overabundance of leeks that I’ve had in my possession as of late. Secondly, I’ve discovered that large amounts of garlic intake and feeding a newborn baby does not go well together and results in a very gassy baby. What does that mean? I’ve had to find a way to replace my love for garlic in MANY of my recipes (sigh). The answer was LEEKS! One day I’ll be able to reintroduce garlic back into my diet but leeks will do for now. You can always add garlic to the recipe below and feel sorry for me later.

The key to keeping your meatloaf from tasting like the Sahara is to COOK your vegetables before adding them to your meat mixture and allowing them to cool. The addition of a little milk to your breadcrumbs will result in a very juicy, memorable (in a good way) meatloaf. I topped this one off with some homemade curry ketchup (you can find a great recipe here) or use some of your favorite bottled kind from the European market.

Meatloaf Leekloaf
Servings
6 people
Servings
6 people
Meatloaf Leekloaf
Servings
6 people
Servings
6 people
Ingredients
Topping
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees
  2. Clean and thinly slice your leek. Finely mince the onion, celery, bell peppers, celery and shred your carrots.
  3. In a saute pan over low-medium heat, add your olive oil, the chopped and shredded veggies and red wine. Add fresh thyme, fennel seeds, salt and pepper. Allow to cook for 15-20 minutes until onions are translucent. Stir frequently. Set aside and allow to COOL.
  4. In a small bowl, add your bread crumbs and milk. Allow to soak for a few minutes.
  5. In a separate large bowl, whisk your egg until frothy. Add your meat, cooked veggie mixture, soaked breadcrumbs and fresh chopped parsley. With clean hands, mix all of the ingredients together.
  6. In a large baking pan, lightly oil the bottom and add the meat mix forming it into (you guessed it) a loaf!
  7. Mix the honey and curry ketchup in a small dish and coat the top of your loaf with appx 1/4 cup.
  8. Cover with foil and bake in the oven for appx 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and add another 1/4 cup of ketchup to the top of it. Place your loaf back into the oven and cook for another 15 minutes.
  9. Slice and serve with the remaining sauce along with some mashed potatoes and your favorite veggies! (We chose beets)
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Sunchokesoup1

Roasted Sunchoke & Leek Soup

Sunchokesoup1

Sunchokes. Also knows as a Jerusalem Artichoke which is certainly not an artichoke nor is it from Jerusalem.  Makes total sense right? Sunchokes are these strange little tubers that originate form North America and was cultivated by the Native Americans.  The plant was discovered as early as 1603, when Samuel de Champlain (the same guy Lake Champlain is named after) described the root to taste like an artichoke, purportedly starting the naming confusion that has haunted the vegetable since its debut.  To add to the linguistic chaos, they’re known as topinambour in Europe (which was a mispronunciation of an indigenous Brazilian tribe that was brought to France for reasons that I probably shouldn’t mention).  In the 1960’s, a few marketing wizards thought it would be in the best interest of the foodie community to rename them.  Hence the birth of the modern sunchoke.  Now that we’ve gotten through the glorious introduction of this weird little tasty vegetable we can get onto the recipe.

In your recent Winter CSA share we included some potatoes, leeks, sunchokes and kale which I’ve used in the recipe below. I have to admit that I’ve never eaten a sunchoke prior to yesterday but was up to the challenge of pulling a recipe out of my little bag of tricks. I was trying to not make another soup for you but with the recent cold weather and frosty Washington mornings, I was craving soup.  I’ve also included a little recipe for a Kale and Hazelnut Pesto that works quite well with the nutty characteristic of the sunchokes.  I threw a little on top with a tiny bit of black truffle olive oil.  The end result was quite tasty.

Click here for the Kale & Hazelnut Pesto recipe

 

 Recipe by: Mirinda @ Boistfort Valley Farm
Roasted Sunchoke & Leek Soup
Servings Prep Time
4 15 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 15 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Roasted Sunchoke & Leek Soup
Servings Prep Time
4 15 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 15 minutes
Cook Time
60 minutes
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Scrub and cut sunchokes into 1 inch thick slices leaving the peel on. On a baking sheet, arrange the sunchokes on parchment paper. Drizzle with olive oil, and roast at 350° for 35-45 minutes, until fully tender.
  3. Remove the outer layer and cut your leeks in half, lengthwise. Rinse each of them by pulling apart all of the layers under cold water. Cut your leeks into into 1/2 inch pieces.
  4. Peel and chop your onion, garlic cloves and potatoes and set aside with the chopped leeks.
  5. Melt butter in a large stock pot or dutch oven oven over medium heat, stirring constantly until it is a deep brown and has a nutty aroma. (About 2 minutes)
  6. Add the your leeks, onions and chopped garlic and roasted sunchokes to the browned butter and cook on medium heat until they are soft and wilted. This should take around 10-15 minutes - be careful not to brown them.
  7. Once everything has cooked down, add your broth and potatoes and and reduce heat to low. Cover your pot and allow to simmer for around 20-25 minutes until the potatoes are tender.
  8. Remove pot from heat, transfer to blender and puree until smooth.
  9. Return soup to pot and add your heavy cream and salt to taste. Serve soup with a teaspoon (or more if you like) of the Kale and Hazelnut Pesto (recipe link included above) and add a couple drops of black truffle oil. Enjoy!
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