Swiss Chard & Kholrabi Fritter

Curry kholrabi and chard fritters w/ cilantro cream sauce

What the heck is a kholrabi? If this odd little veggie is new to you, it tastes a lot like a cross between a broccoli stem and a radish.  It can be eaten raw, steamed or cooked and its quite delicious despite it’s odd alien-like shape. Before eating, it’s important to peel it thoroughly. Beneath it’s thick, hard skin is yet another fibrous layer, which should be peeled away as well. The recipe below is great fried but can also be baked in the oven (400 degrees for 25-30 minutes until golden brown) for a healthier alternative.

Recipe by: Mirinda @ Boistfort Valley Farm
Kholrabi and chard fritters
Servings Prep Time
12 fritters 30 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 fritters 30 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Kholrabi and chard fritters
Servings Prep Time
12 fritters 30 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 fritters 30 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Ingredients
Fritters
Cilantro Sauce
Servings: fritters
Instructions
  1. Remove leaves from the kohlrabi and peel the bulb. Peel your potatoes and carrots. Grate the vegetables in a food processor or by hand using a grater. Squeeze the shredded vegetables in a tea cloth (or with your hands) to remove moisture. Finely mince your onion and add to mixture.
  2. In a separate bowl, add the eggs be beat until frothy. Add to your grated mixture along with your flour, curry, salt and chopped chard or kale.
  3. Place 3/4 cup oil in a large skillet (or enough to have 1/4 inch depth). Heat the oil over medium high heat and place small hand pressed patties of the fritter mixture into the hot oil. Fry on one side until browned, then fry on the other side. Remove and place on a plate lined with a paper towel to drain excess oil.
  4. In a separate bowl, stir sour cream with finely minced cilantro, salt and cayenne pepper. Squeeze 1/2 lime into the mix and serve with your fritters. Top with sliced radishes and green onions.
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stpatty

St. Patrick’s Day Stew

With St. Patrick’s Day approaching, we’ve whipped up a little Irish dinner with some of the goodies we included in this week’s CSA share. I tend to shy away from the American beer with green food colouring and routy “Irish” themed parties. Instead, I try to honor my great-grandparents by cooking some traditional peasant food and having a nice Irish stout. Boring isn’t it?

Included in this recipe are a few items from your box. Potatoes (of course) are used along with the rutabagas, carrots and yellow onions. Traditionally, the stew would be served with lamb but due to some objections in our household we swapped it out with some local Washington pasture beef. Another spin on my usual recipe is the choice of beer. I decided to keep things local by using Iron Horse Brewery’s Irish Death. It’s a little sweeter than Guinness which pairs perfectly with the dish in my personal opinion. All of which came from the wonderfully wet state of Washington.

Served with the stew is some Irish Soda Bread. Plain and simple. Flour, baking soda, salt and buttermilk. For a great recipe and some interesting history of the dish, check out the following site: The Society for the Preservation of Irish Soda Bread.

Now let’s get on with the recipe and Erin go Braugh!

Recipe by: Mirinda @ Boistfort Valley Farm

 

St. Patrick's Day Stew
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 25 minutes
Cook Time
3 hours
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 25 minutes
Cook Time
3 hours
St. Patrick's Day Stew
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 25 minutes
Cook Time
3 hours
Servings Prep Time
6-8 people 25 minutes
Cook Time
3 hours
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Our cat Jones INSISTED on being in the photo but I assure you, no kitties were harmed in the preparation of this dish. The cow on the other-hand I cannot vouch for. Prepare your mise en place (no clue how to say that in Gaelic) By cutting up your onions in large pieces. Smash and finely chop your garlic. Peel and cut your carrots and rutabagas into about 3/4 inch chunks. Scrub and remove eyes from your potatoes and large 1 inch chunks. Set aside.
  2. Season your stew meat with 1 tbsp of salt and and 1 tsp of pepper. Once seasoned, take a few paper towels and DRY the meat really well on all sides. This will help with the searing of the meat.
  3. In a large stock pot or dutch oven, heat to medium-high and add 2 tablespoons of oil. Once the oil is hot, add your meat a little at a time in batches without overcrowding the pot. Sear on each side for about 4 minutes. Add your finished meat to a separate bowl and set aside as you sear each batch.
  4. Remove all of your meat from the stock pot and set aside. Deglaze the pot with 3/4 cup of dry red wine and lower your heat. Whisk for about 4 minutes and get all of the stuck on meat goodies stirred up.
  5. At this point, add your onions and garlic and allow to cook until translucent and your wine has reduced and coated your onions.
  6. Return your meat chunks back to the pot and pour in 2 1/2 cups of stout beer and 32 oz. of beef broth along with your chopped carrots, 1 tablespoon of fresh thyme, 1/2 teaspoon of caraway seeds and Worcestershire sauce. Cover and let simmer on low for 90 minutes.
  7. After your meat and carrots have been simmering, add your potatoes, rutabagas and pearl barley. Cover and simmer on low heat for another hour. This would be a great time to start cooking your Irish Soda Bread *hint hint* (recipe link located above)
  8. After it's been cooking, remove the lid and stir the pot. Make sure to get all of the barley that may be on the bottom. Continue to simmer UNCOVERED for another 30 minutes until the sauce has thickened and your potatoes and barley have cooked through.
  9. Add salt and pepper to taste and chopped parsley. Stir and remove from heat and serve with Irish Soda Bread. Enjoy!
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