Winter 2016 - Week 3

Winter 2016 – Week 3

What’s in the Box:

*Austrian Crescent potatoes
*Carrots-purple
*Red Russian Kale
*Leeks
*Red Cabbage
*Beets
*Parsley
*Dry Beans
Yellow & Red Cipollini Onions (WA)
Ruby Crescent Potatoes (OR)
Enterprise Apples (WA)
Red D’Anjou Pears (WA)
Shiitake Mushrooms (OR)

*grown on our farm

Dear Members,

I know that you all must get tired of me talking about the weather, but let me just say this: WOOOOOOOWWWWW!!

Natty insisted on going out in shorts and a t-shirt yesterday, and then going to the river, which lasted until her feet got cold (about 5 minutes).  Even still, we’re grateful for the Vitamin D. I hope you’re getting a little sunshine on this lovely day.

We have included my favorite dry beans today-a cranberry type bean that is the creamiest most delicious bean ever.  I have included a simple recipe below, but feel free to substitute them in any recipe that calls for dried beans.  My only advice is not to overcook them if you prefer a firm bean-they will become soft and break down if overcooked.
I’ve marked all items from our farm with an asterisk (*).  The other produce is certified organic, Washington or Oregon grown as indicated in the list on the left.

As always, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

Yours,
Heidi

Pack and Go Lunch: Tangled Red Cabbage Salad
Adapted from:  http://www.theclevercarrot.com/2016/01/pack-and-go-lunch-tangled-red-cabbage-salad/
Author: Emilie Raffa (recipe adapted from Heike on Instagram)

For the Dressing
1 tbsp all-natural creamy peanut butter
1 tbsp rice wine vinegar or white vinegar
1 tsp soy sauce
the juice of ½ lime
1 tsp honey, plus more to taste
2 tbsp coconut milk
1 tbsp hot water
dash of hot sauce

For the Salad
1 small red cabbage, sliced paper thin
2 cups shredded kale
2 scallions, white & light green part only, thinly sliced
1-2 clementines, peeled and sliced into wheels
¼ cups pomegranate seeds
1 serving cooked black rice soba noodles (optional)
1 tsp white sesame seeds (optional)

Add all of the dressing ingredients to a small bowl. Whisk until well blended.

To prepare the salad, add the cabbage, kale and scallions to a large bowl. Pour a little bit of the dressing over the top and toss well. Marinate for 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, if using soba noodles, cook them according to the package directions. When finished, rinse under cold water. Drain well and add to the salad.

To finish, add the clementine wheels, pomegranate seeds and sesame seeds (if using). Add additional dressing and toss well to combine. Taste, and add more lime juice as needed.

Serve at room temperature.
Shiitake Angel Hair Pasta
Adapted from: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/11706/shiitake-angel-hair-pasta/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=4 Recipe By:Ann

6 ounces angel hair pasta
6 ounces fresh sliced shiitake mushrooms
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 small onion, chopped
1/4 cup white wine
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 Tablespoon butter
1/4 cup chicken or vegetable broth, preferably low sodium
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
salt to taste
ground black pepper to taste
2 Tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Sauté onion in olive oil and butter over medium heat until soft and translucent.  Add garlic and sauté until just fragrant, then add mushrooms and brown lightly. Add chicken stock and wine, and cook until mixture is reduced to 1/2 volume. Blend in cream, and reduce to desired thickness. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water until al dente.  Drain pasta, and toss with sauce until coated. Serve on small warmed plates, topped with grated Parmesan cheese and parsley.

Simple Beans
To be used as a side with cotija cheese, or served with chips, on tortillas with cheese and toppings, or as desired. If cooking for soup, just cut the cumin and cilantro.

1 1/2 cups dry beans
1 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp coriander
1/2 tsp garlic powder (fresh, high quality — otherwise use more)
1 heaping tsp dried cilantro leaves
1/2 tsp salt

Sort dry beans. Rinse thoroughly and pour into a medium pot. Add water to at least two inches above the level of the beans. Soak overnight OR bring to a boil for approximately 5 minutes, then remove from heat. Let stand one hour.
Once beans have been soaked, or boiled and soaked, pour out water and refill with new, again two inches over the level of the beans. Bring to a boil and add seasonings, but not salt. Simmer until liquid is reduced and beans are soft and creamy, one hour or longer. Add salt and additional seasonings as desired.

 

holidaybox_2015

Holiday Box – December 2015

What’s in the Box:

Green & Purple kohlrabi,
Delicata squash, Carnival squash, Mystery Winter squash
Baking potatoes, Austrian Crescent Potatoes
Leeks, Purple Carrots, Orange Carrots
Beets, Red Russian Kale
Parsley, Honey Crisp Apples
Farm honey

Tomorrow (Tuesday) is the second and final holiday box.  For our Summer members, this is the final box that you will receive as part of your 2015 Summer share.  If you haven’t signed up for our Winter season yet, please consider joining us for January through March! http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/store/

If you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

This delivery’s boxes include a variety of produce from our farm, as well as Washington gorwn organic honey crisp apples and honey from hives that spent the Summer in our fields.  Please note that the honey tends to crystallize quickly, particularly in cooler temperatures.  Crystallization doesn’t affect the quality of the honey or its flavor, and it can be used as-is or decrystallized in a warm water bath.  I do not recommend microwaving the plastic containers. Also note that it is not recommended to give infants under one year of age any honey, raw or processed.  More information and general honey facts are at: http://www.honey.com/faq/

If you’d like more honey, we have some available for purchase on the website too! Please note that you must have an active subscription to purchase honey and other add-on items. http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/store/ (scroll down for Add-ons)

Enjoy!
Heidi
Kohlrabi, Apple, and Carrot Salad with Honey Mustard Dressing
Recipe adapted slightly from The Table: http://www.thetableblog.com/2013/06/kohlrabi-apple-and-carrot-salad/#.Vm9wcb-yqpM

2 Kohlrabi
1 Apple, preferably a tart green one
2 Carrots
1 1/2 Tbsp Honey
1  1/2 Tbsp Grainy Mustard
5 Tbsp Olive Oil
2 Tbsp White Wine Vinegar

Peel the kohlrabi, then slice and cut into matchsticks. Wash the carrots and cut them into matchsticks as well, or as close to matchsticks as possible. (Mine were short and chubby so this was a challenge.) Next, slice the apple and also cut it into matchsticks. You can peel the apple if you wish, but I didn’t.

In a small jar, add all the dressing ingredients (honey through vinegar). Screw the lid on and shake till well mixed. If you don’t have a jar, you can use a bowl and a whisk, but I highly recommend saving a jar or two for making homemade dressing. So easy! Taste the dressing and add more honey or mustard to taste. Then toss all together and enjoy!
Winter Squash Soup with Gruyère Croutons
Adapted from: Bon Appétit December 1996
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/winter-squash-soup-with-gruyere-croutons-2997
The drier squashes will work well in this recipe; use the Delicata sparingly if you choose to include it, as it is very sweet.

Soup:

1/2 stick butter
1 large onion, finely chopped
4 large garlic cloves, chopped
Approximately 40 oz low-salt chicken or vegetable broth
8 cups 1-inch pieces (carefully!) peeled Winter squash (about 3 pounds total)
1 1/4 teaspoons minced fresh thyme
1 1/4 teaspoons minced fresh sage
1/4 cup whipping cream
1 teaspoon sugar (optional)

Croutons:

2 Tablespoons butter
24 baguette bread slices, 1/4-inch-thick
1 cup grated Gruyère cheese
1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme
1 teaspoon minced fresh sage

For soup:

Melt butter in large pot over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and sauté until tender, about 10 minutes. Add broth, all squash and herbs; bring to boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer until squash is very tender, about 20 minutes.

Working in batches, puree soup in blender. Return soup to same pot. Stir in cream and sugar; bring to simmer. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Chill. Rewarm over medium heat before serving.)

For croutons:

Preheat broiler. Butter 1 side of each bread slice. Arrange bread, buttered side up, on baking sheet. Broil until golden, about 1 minute. Turn over. Sprinkle cheese, then thyme and sage over. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Broil until cheese melts, about 1 minute. Ladle soup into bowls. Top each with croutons and serve.

 

2015 Summer CSA Share

Summer 2015 – September, Week 10

What’s in the Box:

Green, Yellow, and Roma Italian beans
Austrian Crescent potatoes
Swiss Chard
Beets
Cucumbers
Crookneck Squash
Sweet onions
Cherry tomatoes
Thyme

 

Greetings Friends,
Mike here! In the office by dim light hustling to finish the notes I promised to write this morning then promptly forgot about. Ooops.

Fall is officially here and we will soon be saying good bye to the summer squash, cucumbers, and tomatoes. We have bumper crops of all the fall favorites, and frankly this is my favorite time of year to eat out of the field. You can still have a ripe tomato, or scrounge a little basil, and the cabbage and other cole crops are huge and lush. The greens are not stressed by hot days, and the potatoes have been in storage just long enough to sweeten up a bit.

On the subject of Fall, please remember that because of our late start this season, if you purchased the summer share, you will be receiving the two holiday deliveries; one in late November, the other in late December. These are usually offered separately. We will be marketing these ‘holiday’ shares to others outside our Summer membership. So, if you receive an offer to purchase them, kindly disregard it. You are in like Flynn. These two deliveries are among my favorites. They are a bit larger than our usual weekly deliveries, and the fall and winter vegetables are soooooo sweet after a frost.

When I looked over the contents of this week’s box I got hungry for pasta. I have included a recipe for Pasta Primavera, I cannot stress strongly enough what a great catch-all dish this is. You can use nearly any vegetables that are in the fridge. I love a plate of Pasta Primavera especially with a good sharp cheese; and it’s easy, and it’s fast, and if you do it right you only have two pots to wash! I enjoy cooking, especially for friends and family, and few recipes garner so much praise for so little effort.

Enjoy!
Mike

 

Pasta Primavera
A few things you should know:

Water and Salt: Always add a big pinch of salt to the pasta water and do not skimp on the amount of water used to cook pasta. I use about a gallon/pound and probably a big tablespoon of salt. Heat the water to a rolling boil, add the pasta and cook UNCOVERED. Use tongs to stir it occasionally and after about 7 minutes start checking it by pulling a strand out and cutting it. In cross section you will see a white core indicating that it is not quite done, as this core vanishes your pasta is ready. Al dente pasta will have just a hint of white in the center. For this dish, because you are going to cook the pasta a bit more, you will want a noticeable but barely so white core.

Sautee: Vegetables while the pasta cooks. Have them all prepped and ready to go before you drop the pasta in the water. If you are sharp and focused you can do this while the water heats. I have used just about every vegetable imaginable, but this week’s box has some of my favorites.

Slice one of the onions paper thin. Snap the stems from the beans and cut into bite size pieces. I especially like the Roma beans for this dish. Cut summer squash into bite size chunks. Thinly slice a good handful of chard leaves. Strip about 3 tablespoons of thyme from its stems. You can use anything that sounds good… anything. I have used beets, rutabaga, turnip, you name it. The traditional Italian vegetables are always a hit.

Sautee: the vegetables in olive oil in a large cast pan while the pasta is cooking; when they are tender turn off the heat.

Scoop: And here is the secret… scoop a mug full of the starchy pasta water off before draining the pasta. Pour this into the pan of vegetables and simmer to create a light sauce. At this point add the thyme and thinly sliced chard and sauté until the chard is just wilted.

Toss: Add the pasta to the pan of vegetables and toss as you would a salad using the tongs over medium heat for a few minutes. Add more pasta water if necessary. You can also toss this all in a large bowl if your pan isn’t large enough.

Stir: In some butter or olive oil and a generous handful of grated sharp cheese; quality counts on the cheese.

Toss again and you are ready for the plate. When you serve this dish serve it hot. Grab a healthy tong-full, hold it over the plate and lower it slowly as you turn the plate and the tongs in opposite directions. This will leave a pyramid of pasta Primavera.

Throw: A few grape or cherry tomatoes, washed and halved, on top of each plate.

Serve with grated cheese and coarse salt.

2015_may_week1

Winter 2015 – May, Week 1

What’s in the Box:

Austrian Crescent potatoes*, Beets*, Leeks*, Cameo Apples,
Asparagus, Radishes, Turnips, Rhubarb, Shiitake Mushrooms,
Spinach, Thyme*, Black Sheep Creamery fresh cheese
*from our farm, all other produce is organic & NW grown

 

Dear Members,

PLEASE TAKE ONE CONTAINER OF CHEESE!

This has been a tough Spring for us, not weather wise (how could we complain about this gorgeousness??), but rather, equipment-wise.  Two tractors giving us trouble, two sets of disks falling apart, literally, in the field (so much for that weld)… and where on earth is the fertilizer?

In the short-term, we have rented a tractor from a dealership (yes, indeed, a tractor dealer-it’s the shiniest piece of equipment we’ve had on the farm since Mike painted our ’48 Farmall) and Mike is powering through to the best of his ability.  We are blessed to have some amazing folks in our community (Shout out to Steve VanTuyl, who is an outstanding builder/welder, and even talks to us when we interrupt his weekends).  In the challenging times, we find the reasons that we love what we do, and we cling to those things (even if we’re swearing under our breath).  Thanks to all of you for being a reason to love our work!

We aren’t quite full steam ahead yet, but we are on our way.  The greenhouse is jam packed, and we’re anticipating taking the seedlings to the field this week and weekend.  Wish us luck!  And functioning equipment!

Also, I’m trying to post our progress on Facebook from time to time, so if you’re curious, go check it out!

Yours,

Heidi

Warm Orzo Salad with Beets & Greens

Recipe and photo courtesy of: The Parsley Thief

Serves 6, as a side dish

3/4 pounds beets with greens
1/4 cup pine nuts
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/2 medium red onion, thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic, minced
8 ounces orzo pasta
3 ounces feta cheese, crumbled
kosher salt & freshly ground pepper

Heat the pine nuts in a dry skillet, over medium heat, until they begin to brown. Watch them carefully, as they will burn in a flash. Remove from the heat & transfer to a bowl. Set aside.
Peel the beets & slice them into bite-sized pieces. Remove the stems from the beet greens & slice the leaves into strips. Wash the greens thoroughly to remove any grit.
Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the sliced red onion & garlic. Cook until the onions are tender & golden brown, about 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium low & add the beet greens. Cover & cook, tossing occasionally, until the greens are wilted, about 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, cook the beets in a pot of salted water, until just tender, about 10-12 minutes. Remove the beets from the pot using a slotted spoon & set aside. Return the water to a boil & add the pasta. Cook, according to the package instructions, until al dente & drain.

Add the orzo to a bowl, along with the beets, pine nuts, beet greens & crumbled feta. Toss, season with salt & pepper to taste & serve.

summer17

Summer 2014 – Week 17

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Cauliflower, Leeks, Napa Cabbage, Gold Potatoes,
Kabocha Squash, Jimmy Nardello Peppers, Eggplant,
& 1 Bouquet of Flowers.
Small shares:
Cauliflower, Leeks, Savoy Cabbage, Beans,
Gold Potatoes, Kale, Kabocha Squash,
Jimmy Nardello Peppers & 1 Bouquet of Flowers.
Family shares:
Spinach, Leeks, Beets, Savoy Cabbage, Tomatoes,
Kale, Gold Potatoes, Kabocha Squash,
Jimmy Nardello Peppers & 1 Bouquet of Flowers.

 

October 9, 2014

Please take 1 Bouquet of Flowers

Dear Friends,

While the weather has become warm and summery once again, the contents of this week’s box sing of the hearty goodness of fall.  As I write, the temperature outside is nearly 80, but I find myself thinking of all of the various soups which could be made with this week’s vegetables!  Creamy Leek and Potato, Sweet Pepper-Tomato Bisque, Hearty Cauliflower and Cabbage Soup…

While speaking of veggies, I’d like to mention two of the items you will find in your boxes.  The first is Kabocha squash.  Kabocha squash is an Asian variety of winter squash, also known as a Japanese pumpkin.  It has an exceptionally sweet flavor and can be used interchangeably with pumpkin in both sweet and savory dishes.  This squash is full of antioxidants and is surprisingly low in starch.  The seeds are also delicious roasted and salted (at 200º on a lightly oiled cookie sheet for about 20 minutes—stirred occasionally).  These are high in Omega-6 and other healthy oils, and great eaten as a snack or sprinkled on any of the soups—the ones mentioned above or in the recipes given below.

Jimmy Nardello Peppers are our other notable addition this week.  The Jimmy Nardello originated in Routi, a small coastal town in Southern Italy.  It was bred in the late 1800’s by Guisteppe Nardello who then brought this heirloom pepper to the United States.  These peppers are known for their sweet creaminess as a frying pepper, but lend their delicious flavor to any dish they are added.

In the theme of winter cooking, I would also like to remind you of our Winter Share, and especially our upcoming Holiday Boxes.  These boxes are a great way to share your appreciation of organic produce with family and friends who might not yet realize the benefits to locally and lovingly grown vegetables.  These large holiday boxes shine with the best of our harvest and speak of the quality of our produce.  It is with great honor that we offer them for your family gatherings to share with the ones you love.  Please follow the link and consider signing up for your Winter Share, which includes our Holiday Boxes in November and December, plus 10 deliveries from January through May:

http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/2014-2015-winter-share-nov-may-C5635

Thanks again and have a wonderful week!

-Emily

From Galilee – This little bouquet marks the end of the fresh flowers.  You can put it in water to be enjoyed fresh for several days.  The statice will continue to open a little.  The extend its beauty, you can then hang it up to dry as recommended for the bouquet from a few weeks ago.  Happy fall!

Summer 2014 – Week 13

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Corn, Kale, Beets, Green Cabbage,
Cherry Tomatoes, Italian Basil,
Garlic & 5 Stems of Sunflowers
Small shares:
Corn, Kale, Red Chard, Green Cabbage,
Beets, Cherry Tomatoes,
Lemon Cucumbers, Italian Basil,
Garlic & 5 Stems of Sunflowers
Family shares:
Corn, Kale, Beets, Green Cabbage,
Cherry Tomatoes, Snow Peas,
Edamame, Italian Basil,
Garlic & 5 Stems of Sunflowers
Please remember to take: 5 Stems of Sunflowers

 

Dear Friends,

Autumn is rapidly approaching. Harvest; harvest season, the Harvest Moon, (tonight), turning a corner, shorter days, cooler nights and mornings, golden light, quiet afternoons with the kids in school, change… You feel it too, right? Forget words. Follow that primordial urge to store the bounty of summer for winter. Can, freeze, dry; a little or a lot. One small bunch of herbs hung to dry in the kitchen, one pint of basil pesto in the freezer, one quart of peppers in vinegar. Just do it. This winter when you look at it, when you taste it, when you can recollect the long days of August without words, you’ll thank me.

Now get crackin’

Reminder: There are still seven deliveries left in our Summer season CSA after today’s. We also offer Fall and Winter deliveries; One delivery in November and one in December, with an eye toward entertaining and family gatherings, and then two deliveries/month January through May. We will be sending out more information in the next week or so and will prioritize our existing customers when filling these programs.

Now seriously, put something up!

Mike

Summer 2014 – Week 14

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Butterhead Lettuce, Fennel, Onions,
Cherry Tomatoes, Beans, Corn & 1 Drying Bouquet
Small shares:
Butterhead Lettuce, Fennel, Onions, Cherry Tomatoes,
Snow Peas, Corn, Eggplant & 1 Drying Bouquet
Family shares:
Butterhead Lettuce, Fennel, Onions, Beets, Beans,
Cherry Tomatoes, Peppers, Corn, Eggplant &
1 Drying Bouquet

 

September 18, 2014

Dear Friends,

Fall is in the air a little early this year – changing light, a light frost, bringing in the squashes.  This past week, while cutting sunflowers, I was blessed with the sight of several tiny frogs basking and hunting in the fall-like sun 4 feet off the ground on sturdy sunflower leaves.  Their green-bronze calmness was a stark contrast to the hustle and bustle of harvest, bunch, wash, pack, label, transport that is the standard rhythm here on the farm.  Both amaze me equally.

Since it is the time of year to stock up for winter, this week I have chosen to make a bouquet for you to DRY.  You will find it IN your box.  It is made from Ornamental Millet, Statice and Lavender.  To preserve it, you should hang it up in a dry place out of direct light for 2 weeks.  Then it will keep its color and lovely scent (the millet smells a bit like curry and maple syrup…) for years to come.  It is a bouquet best viewed from the “top”, so once you have dried it, I suggest placing it on its side in a bookshelf, china cabinet, desk organizer or basket of other summer memories.  I trust you will find the perfect place!

Enjoy the precious fall air,

Galilee – the “flower girl”

PS: Look forward to forthcoming information about signing up for our holiday and winter season CSA! The Email to current members will be going out this week!

Summer 2014 – Week 11

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Lettuce, Eggplant, Green Peppers, Purplette Onions,
Artichokes, Corn, Cherry Tomatoes, Zucchini, Lemon Cucumbers,
Cucumbers & 5 Stems of Sunflowers.
Small Share:
Lettuce, Eggplant, Green Peppers, Purplette Onions,
Artichokes, Beets, Cherry Tomatoes, Corn, Lemon Cucumbers,
Cucumbers & 5 Stems of Sunflowers.
Family Share:
Green Cabbage, Eggplant, Green Peppers, Beans, Corn,
Purplette Onions, Artichokes, Beets, Cherry Tomatoes,
Cucumbers & 5 Stems of Sunflowers.
Please remember to take: 5 Stems of Sunflowers

 

Dear Friends,

This week I would like to talk about the flowers.  We include flowers almost every week, either as individual stems or bouquets.  The flowers are beautiful and sometimes quite unique, but in the midst of all the vegetables, they sometimes get overlooked.

This year at Boistfort Valley Farm, Galilee is our Florist Extraordinaire.  A longtime farmer and certified teacher by trade, Galilee says flowers have always been a part of whatever she is doing; in 2004 she helped start a CSA especially for flowers.

“Flowers are not food, but they are food for us, in a way.  They are beautiful to look at and make our homes more inviting…”  Food for the soul, I might add.

Here at the Farm, Galilee harvests the flowers each week, and arranges them to accompany the boxes.  This takes some expert decision-making on her part, careful forethought on what will be in bloom tomorrow, later in the week, and next week.  Which comes to a tricky issue:  It is very difficult to transport flowers in full bloom.

“Flowers are delicate.  When they are fully open, they get bashed-up,” Galilee says.  “While the blooms are closed, or partially closed, they are still taking up water.  Any slight damage in the handling or delivery will heal as the water is brought up through the veins in the process of the flower opening.  If the flower is damaged while already open, the water is no longer flowing throughout the flower, and therefore will not heal.”

This is partly the reason that you, the customer, often receives closed flowers along with your box.  The other reason is longevity; we want you to be able to enjoy your blooms for as long as possible, as well as experience the opening of the flower for yourself.

As for the vegetables in your boxes this week, you will find a medley of sun-loving treats.  These can be included in a variety of sauces, salsas and relishes as well as the recipes below.  The ‘Spaghetti with Burst Cherry Tomatoes’ makes for a mouth-watering dinner.  Oven-roasting the tomatoes brings out their depth and sweetness.

Enjoy your vegetables and flowers this week, as well as the sunshine!

-Emily

Summer 2014 – Week 10

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Lettuce, Yellow Crookneck Squash, Eggplant, Green Peppers,
Cherry Tomatoes, Lemon Cucumber, Peaches &
1 Bouquet of Flowers
Small shares:
Lettuce, Yellow Crookneck Squash, Eggplant, Green Peppers,
Cherry Tomatoes, Green Onions, Lemon Cucumber, Cucumber,
Peaches & 1 Bouquet of Flowers
Family shares:
Lettuce, Yellow Crookneck Squash, Eggplant, Green Peppers,
Cherry Tomatoes, Green Onions, Beets, English Shell Peas,
Cucumber, Peaches & 1 Bouquet of Flowers


Please remember to take: 1 Bouquet of Flowers

Dear Friends,

“Eating with the fullest pleasure –pleasure, that is, that does not depend on ignorance –is perhaps the profoundest enactment of our connection with the world.  In this pleasure we experience and celebrate our dependence and gratitude, for we are living from mystery, from creatures we did not make and powers we cannot comprehend.”

–Wendell Berry

This week marks the halfway point of our Summer CSA season.  While the long days of sun and warmth seem endless, in just a few weeks, we will be feeling the first creeping traces of autumn—twilight coming a bit early, a foggy chill in the morning air.

In the meantime, however, we are still enjoying the abundance of High Summer.  Sweet tomatoes, juicy peaches, and sharp bell peppers all hold reminders that the season is at its fullest.  And it is in this vein of thought that the above quote comes to mind—the celebration and gratitude of our closeness to the earth, both  as farmers and as eaters…For as Mr. Berry also proposes, “Eating is an agricultural act.  Eating ends the annual drama of the food economy that begins with planting and birth.” 

So, whether we are the farmer walking the field, or the CSA member preparing the vegetables from the box, we are all participating in this great agricultural cycle.  Thank you for being on this journey with us.

One further note before the recipes:  We are still taking new members for the 2014 Summer season.  If you know of anyone interested in a CSA, please spread the word.  Thanks…

-Emily