Winter 2016 CSA - week 4

Winter 2016 – Week 4

What’s in the box?

*Fingerling potatoes, *Orange Carrots, *Purple Carrots, *Swiss Chard, *Red Russian Kale, *Leeks, *Savoy Cabbage, *Baking Potatoes, Yellow Onions, Sunchokes, Parsnips, Cameo Apples, D’Anjou Pears, Baby Boc Choy, Black Sheep Creamery Cheese
*grown on our farm

 

PLEASE TAKE ONE PACKAGE OF CHEESE.
Cheese is packed separately from your veggies to keep it cold.

We are delighted to have a variety of vegetables from our farm once again this week, plus a smattering of other Northwest goodies.  One of the more unusual selections today is the bag of Jerusalem Artichokes, also known as sunchokes.  Sunchokes, or Helianthus tuberosus, are related to sunflowers, and sport a mildly artichoke-like flavor that helps give them their name.  They are known both to be delicious raw AND to cause stomach rumbling/gas when consumed raw, so I leave it to you to determine how you will eat them.  I have included a recipe for cooked sunchokes below.

I’ve marked all items from our farm with an asterisk (*).  The other produce is certified organic and grown as indicated in the list on the left.  We do have one California item this delivery, to my dismay.  I try to keep the boxes as local as possible, but we just don’t have the temperatures to launch the  next season of veggies the way we’d like to, and it’s a fine dance between giving you a variety of greens and roots, and keeping it close to home.  Thanks for your understanding, and if you’re okay with more beets, rutabaga & potatoes, don’t hesitate to let us know!

As always, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

Yours,
Heidi

 

 

Sunchoke and Potato Gratin
Adapted from First Look, Then Cook: http://firstlookthencook.com/2010/02/07/sunchoke-and-potato-gratin/

2 shallots, sliced thin
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp olive oil, plus more to grease pan
1 Tbsp butter
10 sunchokes (about golf-ball sized), peeled, sliced thin
2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and sliced thin
1/4 cup milk
1 cup Black Sheep Creamery cheese
Pinch of nutmeg
Salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Add 1 tsp olive oil and 1 Tbsp butter to skillet.  Add shallot and sauté over medium heat, careful not to brown heavily.  When shallot is translucent, add garlic cloves; cook until just fragrant.  Remove from heat.

Grease a 9×9 ceramic dish lightly with olive oil. Layer the potatoes evenly in the dish covering the entire bottom.  Sprinkle with nutmeg, salt and pepper.  Layer the sunchokes evenly covering the potatoes.  Sprinkle the shallot/garlic mixture on top of the sunchokes – and sprinkle again with salt and pepper.  Pour milk all over the vegetables.  Sprinkle with the cheese.

Cover the dish with tin foil and bake for about 45 minutes.  Take the cover off and bake for an additional 15 minutes.  Make sure the sunchokes are soft – if not cook a little longer.

Ginger/Garlic Savoy Cabbage
from: http://www.food.com/recipe/ginger-garlic-savoy-cabbage-15832

1 head savoy cabbage (about 1 1/2 lbs), cored, shredded across in approx 3/4-inch slices
2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 Tablespoon minced garlic
Salt & pepper
1 1/4 Tablespoons ginger, minced
Juice of 1 lime
Heat wok or large skillet medium high heat, wait until oil is hot.  Add cabbage and stir fry until cabbage just starts to wilt (do nor overcook).  Add garlic, salt and pepper cook 1 minute.  Add ginger cook 1 minute.  Drizzle with lime juice and serve.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/220583/glazed-carrots-and-parsnips-with-chives/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=8

Simple Parsnip Pancakes
Adapted from recipe by Catherine Boynton: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/239758/simple-parsnip-pancakes/?internalSource=recipe%20hub&referringId=2449&referringContentType=recipe%20hub

1 cup grated scrubbed parsnips
2 eggs
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1 Tablespoon olive oil
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
Ground black pepper to taste (optional)
2 teaspoons sunflower oil, or more as needed
Combine parsnips, eggs, onion, olive oil, salt, rosemary, and black pepper together in a bowl until batter is combined and lumpy.
Heat sunflower oil in a heavy frying pan over medium heat. Spoon batter into oil and fry until pancakes are brown and crispy on the edges, 6 to 7 minutes per side.

Winter 2016 CSA - Week 2

Winter 2016 – Week 2

What’s in the Box:

*Swiss Chard, *Kale-Purple, *Carrots , *Rutabaga, *Baking potatoes,
*Leeks, *Garlic, *Thyme, Yellow Onions (WA O), Parsnips (OR O),
Shallots (WA O), Fuji Apples (WA O), D’Anjou Pears (WA O),
Black Sheep Creamery Cheese (Adna, WA)
*grown on our farm

PLEASE TAKE ONE PACKAGE OF CHEESE.
Cheese is packed separately from your veggies to keep it cold.

Greetings from the Boistfort Valley!  The sunny weather has made me grateful and itchy to get outside and work, but the temperature fluctuations remind me of our reality.  Still, it’s nice to go out and trim back the perennials that escaped our attention during the busy seasons, soaking up a little sunshine as a side bonus.

I’ve marked all items from our farm with an asterisk (*).  The other produce is certified organic, Washington or Oregon grown.

Our cheese selection is from Black Sheep Creamery, located about 10 miles from us in Adna, Washington. Brad and Meg Gregory have owned the farm since 1992, and began making cheese over 10 years ago.  They just opened a retail store in downtown Chehalis, so if you’re in the area, stop in to say hello and to try a variety of their products.

“Bastille” cheese is aged two months and tastes young and creamy.  It is a washed curd, Sheep Cow Blend which is quite delicious.  Read more about Black Sheep Creamery, and see the sheep (and lambs!) at their website: http://blacksheepcreamery.com/

As always, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

Yours,
Heidi

 

 

 

Roasted Parsnips Recipe

Adapted from: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/roasted_parsnips/

1 1/2 pounds of parsnips, scrubbed, quartered lengthwise, cut into sticks (think French fry size)

1 generous Tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

Salt and freshly ground pepper

1/3 cup of low sodium vegetable broth
3 Tablespoons butter, softened

4 teaspoons drained, bottled horseradish (how to make homemade horseradish)

2 teaspoons finely chopped parsley or thyme (stems removed)

1 garlic clove, minced.

Pre-heat oven to 400°F. In a large roasting pan, toss the parsnips with olive oil, salt and pepper.  Add the broth, cover and roast, stirring once or twice, until the parsnips are just tender and the stock has evaporated or been absorbed, 20-30 minutes. Remove cover and allow liquid to evaporate and parsnips to brown slightly in places.  Depending on your oven, you may have to broil them briefly to avoid overcooking.

Combine the softened butter with the horseradish, parsley, chives and garlic and season with salt and pepper. Toss the warm roasted parsnips with the horseradish-herb butter and serve.

Leek and Root Vegetable Gratin
Adapted from http://www.recipe.com/leek-and-root-vegetable-gratin/

8 ounces Gruyere or Muenster cheese, shredded (2 cups)

1 Tablespoon finely chopped thyme and/or parsley

1 Tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

2 large rutabaga (about 1 lb.), peeled and thinly sliced

1 pound baking potatoes, scrubbed and thinly sliced

2-3 leeks (2 cups), cleaned and thinly sliced

1 pound large parsnips, peeled and thinly sliced (you received 1 1/2 lbs)

1 1/2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced

Assorted fresh herbs for garnish (optional)
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. In small bowl toss together cheese and chopped herbs; set aside. Coat a 3 qt. rectangular baking dish with olive oil. Layer half the turnip slices on the bottom of the dish, sprinkling salt, pepper, and 3 to 4 tablespoons the cheese mixture.  Follow with half the potato slices, half the leek slices, half the parsnip slices, and half the sweet potato slices, seasoning and adding cheese to each layer. Repeat, ending with sweet potato slices. Reserve remaining cheese mixture.

Cover with foil. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes. Remove foil. Sprinkle remaining cheese mixture over top. Increase oven temperature to 400 degrees F. Continue baking, uncovered, 15 minutes or until cheese is melted and starting to brown.

Remove from oven. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.


Pears with Bastille, Leeks and Fresh Thyme

Don’t layer your pears too much-you want them to get a little crispy around the edges.  If you don’t have the time to put this into the oven, just slice up the cheese and the pears and eat them together.

1 small leek, cleaned, stem sliced into thin coins

1 Tablespoon butter

1 medium D’Anjou pear

6-8 thin slices Black Sheep Creamery Bastille Cheese

A handful of sprigs of thyme

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Sauté the leek gently in butter, until soft and slightly browned in places, about 5 minutes. Slice the pear into thin slices (about 8 slices, keeping the odd bits to eat as you go).  Grease a glass baking dish with a bit of butter, and lay the pear slices in a single layer.  Top each pear with 1 slice of cheese and lay thyme across crosswise.  Bake, uncovered at 350 for 25 minutes, or until cheese is bubbly and pears are soft and a little crispy at the edges.  You may finish these with a quick broil to brown a bit.  (Note: thyme stems aren’t to be eaten)

Winter 2014 – March, week 2

What’s in the Box:

Bulk carrots*, Leeks*, Parsnips*,
Curly kale*, Chives*,  Thyme*,
Red & yellow cipollini onions, Yukon potatoes,
Cameo apples, Black Sheep Creamery cheese
& Daffodils*
*From our farm

 

Please take 1 cheese & 1 bunch daffodils.

Dear Members,

On November 4th, 1803 Thomas Jefferson wrote in a letter to David Williams: “The class principally defective is that of agriculture. It is the first in utility, and ought to be the first in respect. The same artificial means which have been used to produce a competition in learning, may be equally successful in restoring agriculture to its primary dignity in the eyes of men. It is a science of the very first order. It counts among it handmaids of the most respectable sciences, such as Chemistry, Natural Philosophy, Mechanics, Mathematics generally, Natural History, Botany. In every College and University, a professorship of agriculture, and the class of its students, might be honored as the first. Young men closing their academical education with this, as the crown of all other sciences, fascinated with its solid charms, and at a time when they are to choose an occupation, instead of crowding the other classes, would return to the farms of their fathers, their own, or those of others, and replenish and invigorate a calling, now languishing under contempt and oppression. The charitable schools, instead of storing their pupils with a lore which the present state of society does not call for, converted into schools of agriculture, might restore them to that branch qualified to enrich and honor themselves, and to increase the productions of the nation instead of consuming them.”

Word.

Mike

Winter 2014 – March, week 1

What’s in the Box:

Carrots*, Parsnips*, Leeks*, Red Cabbage, Curly Kale, Crimini Mushrooms, Red Delicious Apples,
Sunchokes, Mixed Fingerlings, Yellow Onions, Daffodils, Black Sheep Creamery Cheese.
*From our farm

 
PLEASE TAKE 1 CHEESE & 1 DAFFODIL BUNCH!

Dear Members,

It is a foggy morning here at the farm.  With these longer days, the “spring forward” of Daylight Saving Time, and the realization that everything seemed to get greener last week, I’m pleased to remind you that spring will be here around the time you receive your next box!  Although we are still in winter right now, it is quite exciting to be able to provide our first splash of colorful flowers to your share this week with these cheerful yellow daffodils.

In light of the tough early winter weather which really impacted our greens, in particular, this week we have opted to extend outside of our normal Washington and Oregon region to bring you some red
cabbage and kale from California.  We have thought long and hard about reaching that far out of our region to supplement our CSA and we hope that you enjoy this bit of green.  We look forward to incorporating more locally available greens in upcoming boxes.

A few notes on what is included in this box: We have also included Sunchokes in this box.  The recipe I have added below is one that looks delicious and I, myself, am looking forward to trying!  The cheese included from Black Sheep Creamery is “a fresh, sheep-milk ‘cream’ cheese.”  Tart and tangy, it will keep in the fridge for 2 weeks.  Brad told me that on Friday, it was grass waiting to be eaten, by Saturday it was milk waiting to be given by the sheep, and by Sunday it was being made into cheese. Enjoy!

Kathryn

Winter 2014 – January, week 1

What’s in the Box:

Bulk chioggia and red beets*,
Bulk carrots*, Bulk purple carrots*,
Garlic*, Rutabaga*, Acorn Squash*,
Leeks*, Parsnips*, Yellow onions,
Austrian Crescent potatoes,
Bosc pears, Braeburn apples,
& Black Sheep Creamery cheese
*From our farm

 

Please take 1 cheese.

Dear Members,

I have to admit, when I opened the notes to begin writing I was delighted to find that there was so little room left once the recipes were included. Some days I just have more to say than others. I do hope you all enjoyed the holidays and that your transition back to the grind or the life or just getting the kids back to school and into the routine again has gone smoothly. The house still smells mildly of frankincense and myrrh, and I am happy to report that my annual jigsaw puzzle (this year a 1500 piece Springbok) is on schedule for completion. I set out a puzzle every year on the dining room table and endeavor to complete it before starting the seed order on the same table. The puzzle comes out after the plates are cleared from Christmas dinner, and must be finished in enough time to complete the seed order by January 15th. I am going to be pushing it but I’m confident. I love the annual jigsaw; a concrete and hopeful metaphor. I start by turning all the pieces over, then attempt to identify all the edges, then construct the outline, then separate by color and texture, then begin to fit the puzzle together, one piece at a time, sometimes quickly sometimes slowly, until the image begins to take shape, eventually matching the perfect picture as it appears on the box top. More things in life should be like this.

Enjoy this deliveries add-on; Black Sheep Creamery’s Tin Willow Tomme. Tomme is a type of cheese produced mainly in the French Alps, and is traditionally a bit lower in fat than other more ‘full’ cheeses. Brad at Black Sheep identifies it as a bit milder by comparison, and an excellent cheese to pair with fruit and a red wine for an appetizer. Check out Black Sheep Creamery on the web at www.blacksheepcreamery.com .

Mike