Butternut Squash soup

Kürbissuppe – German squash soup

A simple soup, perfect for a rainy winter day. The German variation includes apples, parsnips and carrots to enhance the character of the butternut squash. Your recent winter CSA share included some yummy root veggies along with the butternut squash, potatoes and Fuji Apples. We decided to cook them up and turn them into a creamy, velvety comforting soup.

Recipe by: Mirinda @ Boistfort Valley Farm

 

INGREDIENTS
3 medium Butternut Squash
2 Fuji Apples
4 large Parsnips
4 large Carrots
3 large Fingerling Potatoes
1 white Onion
1/4 cup Butter
1 quart Vegetable Broth
2 cups Half & Half
1/2 tsp Ground Ginger
1 1/2 tsp Curry Powder
salt to taste

 

  1.  Preheat oven to 350F degrees.
  2.  Cut your squash down the center and remove seeds. Place face down onto a large baking sheet.
  3. Peel carrots and parsnips and remove the tops. Place on baking sheet along with your squash and put into your oven. Allow to cook for approximately 30-45 minutes (until your parsnips and carrots have a golden, roasted look) Remove your carrots and parsnips and set aside. Place your squash back into the oven for another 30-40 minutes or until fork tender.
  4. Peel and chop your onion and apples and add to a stockpot along with your butter on medium-low heat. Allow to cook until the onions are clear.
  5. Peel and chop your potatoes and add to your stockpot along with your roasted carrots, parsnips and vegetable broth. Cover and let simmer until potatoes and carrots are tender.
  6. At this point, your squash should be done cooking. Remove from your oven and set aside to cool.
  7. When your carrots, taters and those other tasty ingredients in the stock pot are tender, remove from heat and place ingredients into a blender. Puree until smooth and pour back into your stock pot. (You can also use an immersion blender if your prefer)
  8. Remove the flesh away from the skin of the squash and place in your blender along with the half & half. Puree until smooth and add to your stock pot. Return to the stove and allow to simmer on low and stir well.
  9. Add your ginger, curry and salt to the pot.
  10. Your soup is ready to eat! Grab a bowl and dig in!
Winter CSA

Winter 2015 – January, Week 1

What’s in the Box:

Teggia Dry Beans*, Red Russian Kale*, Parsnips*, Carrots*
Fingerling Potato Mix*, Garlic*, Acorn Squash*, Butternut Squash*
Red D’Anjou Pears, Fuji Apples,
Black Sheep Creamery’s: Mopsie’s Best
*From our farm

Dear Friends,

I hope you all enjoyed some time with friends and family over the past two weeks. After harvest the afternoon of December 23rd, we all cleaned up our gear, whether it was a harvest knife, a field truck, or a desk, and took a nice long break. We just got back in this morning.

We returned to heavy rains. The field crew is out putting the final touches on the harvest for our deliveries this week. Bj and I are in the office sort of rearranging piles and playing a little catch up. Rachel and Maia are in the pack shed laying the foundation for this week’s deliveries.

The South Fork of the Chehalis is high and muddy, but staying within its banks. The river that bisects the farm and meanders through this Valley is largely influenced by springs and run off from the Eastern foothills of the Willipa Hills that stretch from here to the coast. If there is no snow in the hills we are relatively safe from flooding. This is not true of those rivers influenced by the Cascades. Whenever there are rains like these I spend a certain amount of time watching the river forecasts generated by NOAA: http://www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/rfc/

It’s not exactly funny cat videos on youtube, but it does give a fairly accurate projection of stream flow and gauge height of rivers and I am truly grateful for the tool. There are several local rivers that are up and over their banks, and many that have not yet peaked, but will do so tomorrow as the water drains from the upper watershed to the lower lying areas like Grand Mound and Porter. It takes almost twelve hours for the peak to reach the Centralia area from Adna near the farm, and another eight before it settle into the lower Chehalis by Ground Mound and Rochester. I can drive to Centralia in about twenty minutes. Fascinating yes?

Having been through a flood, and I could write volumes about that experience, I find myself a bit distracted and anxious whenever we get this much rain. My thoughts and prayers are with anyone that is being or might be affected by these recent rains. I am hopeful that our deliveries are not delayed, but this is not our first rodeo, and we do not anticipate any issues.

So without further ado, welcome to the first of ten January through May deliveries. You will notice the inclusion of some beautiful Eastern Washington fruit, as well as a local sheep’s cheese: Mopsie’s Best. Named after Brad and Meg’s first ewe, this is a hard cheese made with raw milk using an English recipe, and aged 6months. This cheese would pair beautifully with the pears and apples in this week’s delivery, as well as being a nice addition grated over baked or roasted squash and carrots.

Booya!
Mike

 

Teggia Beans

Teggia Beans drying in September.

Teggia beans on the vine.

Teggia beans on the vine.