Winter 2016 CSA - week 4

Winter 2016 – Week 4

What’s in the box?

*Fingerling potatoes, *Orange Carrots, *Purple Carrots, *Swiss Chard, *Red Russian Kale, *Leeks, *Savoy Cabbage, *Baking Potatoes, Yellow Onions, Sunchokes, Parsnips, Cameo Apples, D’Anjou Pears, Baby Boc Choy, Black Sheep Creamery Cheese
*grown on our farm

 

PLEASE TAKE ONE PACKAGE OF CHEESE.
Cheese is packed separately from your veggies to keep it cold.

We are delighted to have a variety of vegetables from our farm once again this week, plus a smattering of other Northwest goodies.  One of the more unusual selections today is the bag of Jerusalem Artichokes, also known as sunchokes.  Sunchokes, or Helianthus tuberosus, are related to sunflowers, and sport a mildly artichoke-like flavor that helps give them their name.  They are known both to be delicious raw AND to cause stomach rumbling/gas when consumed raw, so I leave it to you to determine how you will eat them.  I have included a recipe for cooked sunchokes below.

I’ve marked all items from our farm with an asterisk (*).  The other produce is certified organic and grown as indicated in the list on the left.  We do have one California item this delivery, to my dismay.  I try to keep the boxes as local as possible, but we just don’t have the temperatures to launch the  next season of veggies the way we’d like to, and it’s a fine dance between giving you a variety of greens and roots, and keeping it close to home.  Thanks for your understanding, and if you’re okay with more beets, rutabaga & potatoes, don’t hesitate to let us know!

As always, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

Yours,
Heidi

 

 

Sunchoke and Potato Gratin
Adapted from First Look, Then Cook: http://firstlookthencook.com/2010/02/07/sunchoke-and-potato-gratin/

2 shallots, sliced thin
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp olive oil, plus more to grease pan
1 Tbsp butter
10 sunchokes (about golf-ball sized), peeled, sliced thin
2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and sliced thin
1/4 cup milk
1 cup Black Sheep Creamery cheese
Pinch of nutmeg
Salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Add 1 tsp olive oil and 1 Tbsp butter to skillet.  Add shallot and sauté over medium heat, careful not to brown heavily.  When shallot is translucent, add garlic cloves; cook until just fragrant.  Remove from heat.

Grease a 9×9 ceramic dish lightly with olive oil. Layer the potatoes evenly in the dish covering the entire bottom.  Sprinkle with nutmeg, salt and pepper.  Layer the sunchokes evenly covering the potatoes.  Sprinkle the shallot/garlic mixture on top of the sunchokes – and sprinkle again with salt and pepper.  Pour milk all over the vegetables.  Sprinkle with the cheese.

Cover the dish with tin foil and bake for about 45 minutes.  Take the cover off and bake for an additional 15 minutes.  Make sure the sunchokes are soft – if not cook a little longer.

Ginger/Garlic Savoy Cabbage
from: http://www.food.com/recipe/ginger-garlic-savoy-cabbage-15832

1 head savoy cabbage (about 1 1/2 lbs), cored, shredded across in approx 3/4-inch slices
2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 Tablespoon minced garlic
Salt & pepper
1 1/4 Tablespoons ginger, minced
Juice of 1 lime
Heat wok or large skillet medium high heat, wait until oil is hot.  Add cabbage and stir fry until cabbage just starts to wilt (do nor overcook).  Add garlic, salt and pepper cook 1 minute.  Add ginger cook 1 minute.  Drizzle with lime juice and serve.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/220583/glazed-carrots-and-parsnips-with-chives/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=8

Simple Parsnip Pancakes
Adapted from recipe by Catherine Boynton: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/239758/simple-parsnip-pancakes/?internalSource=recipe%20hub&referringId=2449&referringContentType=recipe%20hub

1 cup grated scrubbed parsnips
2 eggs
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1 Tablespoon olive oil
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
Ground black pepper to taste (optional)
2 teaspoons sunflower oil, or more as needed
Combine parsnips, eggs, onion, olive oil, salt, rosemary, and black pepper together in a bowl until batter is combined and lumpy.
Heat sunflower oil in a heavy frying pan over medium heat. Spoon batter into oil and fry until pancakes are brown and crispy on the edges, 6 to 7 minutes per side.

2015summer_week11

Summer 2015 – October, Week 11

What’s in the Box:

Celery, Cucumbers, Yellow & Purple beans, Bell pepper,
Baby bok choy, Cilantro, Tomatoes, Cameo apples,
Dried Lavender (not intended for eating)

Dear Members,

What do farmers do when they take a weekend trip out of town? Visit other farms of course. It kind of sounds silly reading it, but that is exactly what Heidi and Nat and I did this past weekend. We pointed the Ford f-350 north and headed up to the Skagit Valley to check out some farms and ranches during their two day ‘Festival of Family Farms’. We visited Cascadian Farm outside Rockport and checked out their blueberry harvester and had ice cream and actually picked a few pumpkins. We spent a few hours painting baby pumpkins and shopping for a variety of unique plants at Cloud Mountain outside Everson. We had brisket and corn on the cob, and visited with cattle and draft horses at Ovenell’s Double O Ranch outside Concrete. In short, we had a whirlwind tour of some great farms in the Skagit Valley and left with a deep appreciation for the farms themselves and what they are doing, as well as a lot of respect for the way Whatcom county has supported them and created an atmosphere where the contribution these agricultural businesses make to the community and the region are highlighted and acknowledged. Are you listening Lewis County?

This week’s delivery continues the trend into fall and includes some cool weather loving Bok Choy, some fresh crop apples, and our first celery. Also included in this delivery is two bunches of dried lavender. It was harvested this Summer and was hung in the barn to dry.  What to do with a bunch of dried lavender? Put it into a vase to enjoy as a dry bouquet, or make a lavender sachet to place in a drawer or somewhere you would like a fresh scent.

What you’ll need for a lavender sachet:

A square of pretty fabric (Heidi recommends at least an 8″ square)

A ribbon to tie it with-long enough to make a bow
Remove the lavender flowers from their stems with your fingertips over a large cookie sheet or bowl. Place the flowers in the center of the cloth, fold the fabric on the diagonal and gather the fabric edges together.  Tie at least an inch below the fabric edges and trim any long edges. Easy!

Please enjoy this week’s delivery and stay tuned as we continue our journey into Fall.

Mike

2015_may_week1

Winter 2015 – May, Week 1

What’s in the Box:

Austrian Crescent potatoes*, Beets*, Leeks*, Cameo Apples,
Asparagus, Radishes, Turnips, Rhubarb, Shiitake Mushrooms,
Spinach, Thyme*, Black Sheep Creamery fresh cheese
*from our farm, all other produce is organic & NW grown

 

Dear Members,

PLEASE TAKE ONE CONTAINER OF CHEESE!

This has been a tough Spring for us, not weather wise (how could we complain about this gorgeousness??), but rather, equipment-wise.  Two tractors giving us trouble, two sets of disks falling apart, literally, in the field (so much for that weld)… and where on earth is the fertilizer?

In the short-term, we have rented a tractor from a dealership (yes, indeed, a tractor dealer-it’s the shiniest piece of equipment we’ve had on the farm since Mike painted our ’48 Farmall) and Mike is powering through to the best of his ability.  We are blessed to have some amazing folks in our community (Shout out to Steve VanTuyl, who is an outstanding builder/welder, and even talks to us when we interrupt his weekends).  In the challenging times, we find the reasons that we love what we do, and we cling to those things (even if we’re swearing under our breath).  Thanks to all of you for being a reason to love our work!

We aren’t quite full steam ahead yet, but we are on our way.  The greenhouse is jam packed, and we’re anticipating taking the seedlings to the field this week and weekend.  Wish us luck!  And functioning equipment!

Also, I’m trying to post our progress on Facebook from time to time, so if you’re curious, go check it out!

Yours,

Heidi

Winter 2014 – April, week 2

What’s in the Box:

Bulk carrots*, Leeks*, Curly Kale*,
Rhubarb, Red radish, Yukon potatoes,
Rainbow Chard, Oyster mushrooms,
Red dandelion, Cameo apples
& Tayberry Jam
*From our farm

 

Dear Members,

Today is Earth Day.  We are enjoying a combination of both sun and rain here in the valley, typical of our Pacific Northwest spring.  This is a season of change; we are reminded of this as the sharp breezes and cold showers are warmed by bright sun breaks.  It is in this transition of winter-to-spring that seedlings thrive, reveling in the steaminess of the newly-turned ground and satisfying our long-standing anticipation of the days to come.

At this time of year in the kitchen, we are in transition as well.  We are just beginning to enjoy the fruits of new-things-growing, while still holding ourselves over with our winter fare.  In this week’s box, the sturdy, cold-hardy standbys of leeks, kale, carrots and potatoes are spiced up by glimpses of the freshness of spring—dandelion greens, rhubarb and oyster mushrooms.  This week especially, greens are exploding in our area, and in our boxes, adding a lushness to the mix.  In MY kitchen, I have been adding shredded kale to everything — from salads, to curries, to pizza.  As this is quickly becoming redundant, I am looking forward to trying Rachel’s recipes this week.

In this week’s notes, I would also like to introduce myself.  My name is Emily and I have recently joined the Boistfort Valley Farm team as our Sales and Outreach representative.  I grew up in the valley, next door to the land which is now the farm.  I find it a bit nostalgic to think that the fields I ran and played in as a kid now hold the vegetables that nourish my family as well as yours.

Emily

Winter 2014 – March, week 2

What’s in the Box:

Bulk carrots*, Leeks*, Parsnips*,
Curly kale*, Chives*,  Thyme*,
Red & yellow cipollini onions, Yukon potatoes,
Cameo apples, Black Sheep Creamery cheese
& Daffodils*
*From our farm

 

Please take 1 cheese & 1 bunch daffodils.

Dear Members,

On November 4th, 1803 Thomas Jefferson wrote in a letter to David Williams: “The class principally defective is that of agriculture. It is the first in utility, and ought to be the first in respect. The same artificial means which have been used to produce a competition in learning, may be equally successful in restoring agriculture to its primary dignity in the eyes of men. It is a science of the very first order. It counts among it handmaids of the most respectable sciences, such as Chemistry, Natural Philosophy, Mechanics, Mathematics generally, Natural History, Botany. In every College and University, a professorship of agriculture, and the class of its students, might be honored as the first. Young men closing their academical education with this, as the crown of all other sciences, fascinated with its solid charms, and at a time when they are to choose an occupation, instead of crowding the other classes, would return to the farms of their fathers, their own, or those of others, and replenish and invigorate a calling, now languishing under contempt and oppression. The charitable schools, instead of storing their pupils with a lore which the present state of society does not call for, converted into schools of agriculture, might restore them to that branch qualified to enrich and honor themselves, and to increase the productions of the nation instead of consuming them.”

Word.

Mike