Winter 2016 CSA - week 1

Winter 2016 – Week 1

What’s in the Box:

*Savoy Cabbage, *Kale-Curly , *Parsley-Curly , *Carnival squash,
*Baking potatoes, *Austrian Crescent potatoes, *Golden Beets,
*Leeks, *Carrots-Purple & Orange, Braeburn Apples, D’Anjou Pears
Santa Lucia Coffee

*grown on our farm

Happy New Year!  We have a variety of lovely produce for the deliveries this week.  All items with an asterisk (*) are from our farm.  The other produce is certified organic, Washington grown (this is, the apples and pears).

As a reminder, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website orcontact us at the farm.

The cold temperatures and the snow have kept us out of the field for the last little bit, but they didn’t do much damage to the Winter veggies.  The snow especially delighted Natty, who was out there throwing snowballs morning and night, much to the displeasure of our Labrador, Dinah.  Snowballs, unlike tennis balls, explode on impact, and Dinah learned this the first time she caught one in her mouth.  She spent the rest of the day lurking on the porch, staring out the window, presumably waiting for the snow to melt.
Well, melt it did, but it’s been quite icy in the mornings, and we step carefully around the farm to keep from slipping and sliding, especially with loads of produce.  We are looking forward to the warmer rainy weather we were promised by the folks who study these things. Please be careful out there when picking up your boxes!

We have a special treat in the boxes today: a locally roasted coffee provided by our favorite roasters and friends at Santa Lucia Coffee Roasters, Justin and Lucy Page.  Here’s a little something that Justin sent me about the coffee included with your produce:

The San Rafael Urias farm rests on the side of a small mountain in the valley of San Miguel Duenas, Antigua. It is shadowed by the Agua (Water) and Fuego (Fire) volcanoes. Founded by Rafael Valdes Quiroa in the late 1880s, it is now owned and managed by the third generation of the family, headed by Don Isidro Valdes.  Workers on the farm are allowed to grow their own crops in these areas. There is also some land reserved as forest, providing a sanctuary for migrant birds.

San Rafael is also benefited by small natural springs, which give clean drinking water and irrigation for the seedlings in the nursery. They have now piped this spring over 1.5km to their mill and use it for the washing and pulping of the cherries (the raw coffee beans). The farm is also next to the Guacalote River, which is used to provide hydraulic energy to the coffee mill.

This is a genuine Antigua coffee as certified by the APCA, the genuine Antigua Coffee Growers Association. The APCA was created by local producers in 2000 to protect the ‘Antigua’ reputation. Unfortunately, many lesser quality Guatemalan coffees were sold under this prestigious name and it became damaging for the true local producers. The APCA have gone on to help other growers in the area with training and support to further their craft. Enjoy!
Yours,
Heidi

 

 

 

Cabbage Fried Rice
Adapted from: http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/cabbage-fried-rice

2 Tablespoons vegetable oil

1 leek, halved or quartered lengthwise, cut into 1/4-inch slices

1 cup thinly sliced or julienned carrots

4 cups shredded Savoy cabbage

2 garlic cloves, minced

2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger

1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice

4 large eggs, beaten

2 Tablespoons soy sauce

Juice of 1 lime
2 scallions, thinly sliced
Cook rice in a pot of boiling salted water until al dente.  Drain immediately.
In a nonstick wok or large skillet, heat the oil. Add the leek, carrots and cabbage and stir-fry over high heat until the vegetables are softened and beginning to brown, about 7 minutes. Add the garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the rice and stir-fry until heated through and beginning to brown, about 3 minutes.

Push the fried rice to the side of the pan to create a well. Pour the eggs into the well and cook, stirring gently, until nearly cooked. Toss the fried rice with the eggs and cook for 1 minute longer. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the soy sauce, lime juice and scallions. Transfer the fried rice to bowls and serve.

Warm Golden Beet Salad with Greens and Almonds
Adapted from: http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-warm-golden-beet-salad-116139

1 ½ lbs golden beets (you received 2 lbs total in your share)
½ bunch of kale
Olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 cloves garlic, minced
4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
2/3 cup toasted almond slivers
Heat the oven to 425°F. Line a 9-inch square baking pan or cake tin with a big square of foil, large enough to complete enclose the beet roots. Lightly rinse the beet roots to remove any really clumpy dirt and pat them dry. Place them in the foil square and lightly drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle generously with salt and pepper. Fold up the foil and crease to seal. Bake the beets for 60 minutes or until they can be just pierced with a fork. Set aside to cool.
Meanwhile, strip the kale leaves from the stems, and chop leaves into bite-size ribbons. Rinse thoroughly. Discard stems. In a large skillet, heat a drizzle of olive oil over medium heat; add garlic. Cook on low for about 2 minutes or until garlic is golden and fragrant. Add kale leaves and stir to coat. Cook on medium-low for about 10 minutes or until leaves are soft and tender. Add a bit of water if needed to keep the kale from drying out/scorching. Remove from heat.
When the beets are cool, remove skins (they should slip off easily). Chop beets into bite-sized pieces and toss with the cooked greens, goat cheese, and almonds. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve warm or cold.

holidaybox_2015

Holiday Box – December 2015

What’s in the Box:

Green & Purple kohlrabi,
Delicata squash, Carnival squash, Mystery Winter squash
Baking potatoes, Austrian Crescent Potatoes
Leeks, Purple Carrots, Orange Carrots
Beets, Red Russian Kale
Parsley, Honey Crisp Apples
Farm honey

Tomorrow (Tuesday) is the second and final holiday box.  For our Summer members, this is the final box that you will receive as part of your 2015 Summer share.  If you haven’t signed up for our Winter season yet, please consider joining us for January through March! http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/store/

If you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

This delivery’s boxes include a variety of produce from our farm, as well as Washington gorwn organic honey crisp apples and honey from hives that spent the Summer in our fields.  Please note that the honey tends to crystallize quickly, particularly in cooler temperatures.  Crystallization doesn’t affect the quality of the honey or its flavor, and it can be used as-is or decrystallized in a warm water bath.  I do not recommend microwaving the plastic containers. Also note that it is not recommended to give infants under one year of age any honey, raw or processed.  More information and general honey facts are at: http://www.honey.com/faq/

If you’d like more honey, we have some available for purchase on the website too! Please note that you must have an active subscription to purchase honey and other add-on items. http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/store/ (scroll down for Add-ons)

Enjoy!
Heidi
Kohlrabi, Apple, and Carrot Salad with Honey Mustard Dressing
Recipe adapted slightly from The Table: http://www.thetableblog.com/2013/06/kohlrabi-apple-and-carrot-salad/#.Vm9wcb-yqpM

2 Kohlrabi
1 Apple, preferably a tart green one
2 Carrots
1 1/2 Tbsp Honey
1  1/2 Tbsp Grainy Mustard
5 Tbsp Olive Oil
2 Tbsp White Wine Vinegar

Peel the kohlrabi, then slice and cut into matchsticks. Wash the carrots and cut them into matchsticks as well, or as close to matchsticks as possible. (Mine were short and chubby so this was a challenge.) Next, slice the apple and also cut it into matchsticks. You can peel the apple if you wish, but I didn’t.

In a small jar, add all the dressing ingredients (honey through vinegar). Screw the lid on and shake till well mixed. If you don’t have a jar, you can use a bowl and a whisk, but I highly recommend saving a jar or two for making homemade dressing. So easy! Taste the dressing and add more honey or mustard to taste. Then toss all together and enjoy!
Winter Squash Soup with Gruyère Croutons
Adapted from: Bon Appétit December 1996
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/winter-squash-soup-with-gruyere-croutons-2997
The drier squashes will work well in this recipe; use the Delicata sparingly if you choose to include it, as it is very sweet.

Soup:

1/2 stick butter
1 large onion, finely chopped
4 large garlic cloves, chopped
Approximately 40 oz low-salt chicken or vegetable broth
8 cups 1-inch pieces (carefully!) peeled Winter squash (about 3 pounds total)
1 1/4 teaspoons minced fresh thyme
1 1/4 teaspoons minced fresh sage
1/4 cup whipping cream
1 teaspoon sugar (optional)

Croutons:

2 Tablespoons butter
24 baguette bread slices, 1/4-inch-thick
1 cup grated Gruyère cheese
1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme
1 teaspoon minced fresh sage

For soup:

Melt butter in large pot over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and sauté until tender, about 10 minutes. Add broth, all squash and herbs; bring to boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer until squash is very tender, about 20 minutes.

Working in batches, puree soup in blender. Return soup to same pot. Stir in cream and sugar; bring to simmer. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Chill. Rewarm over medium heat before serving.)

For croutons:

Preheat broiler. Butter 1 side of each bread slice. Arrange bread, buttered side up, on baking sheet. Broil until golden, about 1 minute. Turn over. Sprinkle cheese, then thyme and sage over. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Broil until cheese melts, about 1 minute. Ladle soup into bowls. Top each with croutons and serve.

 

Summer 2015 week 16

Summer 2015 – October, Week 16

What’s in the Box:

Green cabbage, Carnival squash, Delicata squash, corn, red potatoes, gold turnip, kohlrabi, purple carrots, red chard, broccoli

This week’s boxes are a bit heavy, reflecting the beginnings of the storage season.  Please lift with your legs when you pick up your share!  Next week’s boxes will be even heavier, so you might want to bring a cloth bag or two to help distribute the weight.
This week’s corn is the last of the season, and although it’s quite yummy, it didn’t get the heat that it should have to help it pollinate fully.  Please enjoy it in all its November local-corn glory anyway.  We’ve never had corn in November before, and may never again!

Just a reminder: the Winter share is available now-sign up soon to receive your prepayment discount!  http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/2016-january-through-march-only-C6854
I haven’t left much room to wax poetic about the weather or on-farm happenings, but I have yummy recipes to share, so perhaps that’s even better!

Enjoy!

Heidi

 

 

Moroccan-Style Stuffed Acorn Squash
Adapted from AllRecipes.com

2 Tablespoons brown sugar
1 Tablespoon butter, melted
1 large Carnival squash, halved and seeded
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped
2 carrots, chopped
1 cup garbanzo beans, drained
1/2 cup raisins
1 1/2 Tablespoons ground cumin
salt and pepper to taste
14 ounces low sodium chicken or vegetable broth
1 cup uncooked couscous

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Arrange squash halves cut side down on a baking sheet. Bake 45 minutes, or until tender. Dissolve the sugar in the melted butter. Brush squash with the butter mixture, and keep squash warm while preparing the stuffing.

Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Stir in the celery and carrots, and cook 5 minutes. Add garlic and sauté an additional minute, until fragrant.  Mix in the garbanzo beans and raisins. Season with cumin, salt, and pepper, and continue to cook and stir until vegetables are tender.

Pour broth into the skillet, and mix in the couscous. Cover skillet, and turn off heat. Allow couscous to absorb liquid for 10-15 minutes or until cooked.  Fluff with fork and stuff squash halves with the skillet mixture to serve.

Swiss Chard with Spicy Peanut Sauce

Adapted from: http://www.pennilessparenting.com/2014/02/swiss-chard-with-spicy-peanut-sauce.html

1 Tablespoon safflower oil
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
1 large onion
1 bunch Swiss chard
1/4 cup water (or as needed)
2 Tablespoons peanut butter
2 Tablespoons soy sauce
1 Tablespoon honey or sugar
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon ginger powder
Salt to taste
Sprinkle of red pepper flakes

Chop onion and sauté in oil until soft and translucent.
Chop up the stems of the Swiss chard and add them to the onion. Cook until they start to soften.
Chop up the leaves of the chard and add them to the pot. Cover, and cook, mixing occasionally, until wilted.
Add the rest of the ingredients, mix well, and cook a few more minutes.

Enjoy!

Kohlrabi and Carrot Slaw
Adapted from http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-kohlrabi-and-carrot-slaw-recipes-from-the-kitchn-46627

1 large kohlrabi, peeled, stems trimmed off, grated
1/4 head cabbage, shredded
2 medium carrots, scrubbed and grated
1/2 onion, grated
4 Tablespoons chopped cilantro
1/4 cup golden raisins (optional)
1/4 cup mayonnaise
1 Tablespoon cider vinegar
1 Tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt

Combine the kohlrabi, cabbage, carrots, onion, cilantro, and raisins (if using) in a large bowl. In a smaller bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, cider vinegar, sugar, and salt. Pour the dressing over the slaw, and mix until fully coated. Chill for several hours before serving.

Jan_week2_2015

Winter 2015 – January, Week 2

What’s in the box?

Thyme*, Shiitake Mushrooms, Leeks*, Mix Beets*, Bosc Pears,
Braeburn Apples, Garlic*, Chieftain Potatoes*, Carnival Squash*,
European Kraut

*from our farm

Greetings Friends,

I hope this note finds you well. The sun is beaming through the office windows right now. I am at the desk… again. Ughhhhh!!! Pardon me for sharing the fact that I find this difficult. I so want to appear clever and well adjusted, but when the sun is shining I want to be out there; especially when it is such a rare treat. Back in the anciently olden times before I wore shoes every day, I farmed seasonally. (I know, I know; here he goes again, right?) I would fold up every year just after Halloween. As the farm grew, it became increasingly difficult to reinvent the wheel every year in terms of our most valued staff, and it became increasingly difficult to just leave our summer CSA members out there shopping at the Co-op or Fred Meyer and hope that they would return every spring. So the winter CSA was born.

The first two years (or was it three?) we delivered once per month, then last year we began delivering twice per month during the dark days of January through May. The idea had its roots in altruism regarding the continued employment of our staff, and the uninterrupted contact with our customers, or at least those who chose to participate. The advantages to the farm are obvious as well, and there is another significant and positive impact. Today I had a conversation with a local business owner, Justin Page, who with his wife, owns and operates Santa Lucia Coffee Roasters, http://www.justindustries.com/ . I stopped in to pick up some coffee for a customer and ordered enough to include in our first February delivery. He was delighted by the order, 175 12oz bags, and praised the farm as a ‘curator’ of local products. I must admit, the impact our purchases have on local producers escaped me, well not entirely, but because the winter CSA grew slowly, I had not recognized just how much it helps other producers in the area.

Our previous delivery included cheese from a local sheep dairy; almost 50 lbs of cheese. This week’s delivery will include kraut from a local producer who in turn buys their cabbage from us. Oly Kraut, www.olykraut.com, is a fast growing company that puts their money where their mouth is and contracts with us every year for thousands of pounds of cabbage. Included is their Eastern European Kraut with cabbage, onion, apple, carrot, caraway seeds, grapefruit juice, and Celtic Sea Salt.Owner Sash Sunday says, “This makes the best Reuben in the universe!  The caraway seeds and apple give it a distinct flavor that has made it one of our most popular flavors, and it even won a Good Food Award in 2012.” So please enjoy, and while you’re at it consider the ‘local multiplier effect’; eating well and supporting a local living economy, what could be better?

Yours,

Mike

December Holiday Box

Winter 2014 – December Holiday Box

What’s in the box?

Red Russian Kale, Italian Parsley, Parsnips, Rutabaga,
Mixed Beets, Rainbow Carrots, Leeks, D’ Anjou Pears,
Shallots, Garlic, Austrian Crescent Potatoes, Yellow Potatoes (Chieften),
Orange Kabocha Squash, Carnival Squash, Dried Statice

 

Welcome Dear Friends,

I am not sure what the word is to describe looking back at the newsletters from previous years to get inspiration and realizing the cyclical nature of farming; telling, revelatory, obvious… I could quite literally cross out the date on many of these and write the current date in with crayon. December’s delivery is historically just before the solstice; a time of renewal, a time of hope. These are the shortest days of the year. Depressing? Maybe, but consider this: the solstice is the turning point. Starting December 21st our days will begin to get longer: hope. Maybe the word I’m looking for is humility.

Suddenly, it seems, I have been farming for a long time. I have been here before, writing this letter in the warm office while the crew slogs through the mud, missing my daily role in the fields AND being thankful that I do not have to be out there, puzzling over what to use to fill the deliveries AND marveling at all that is still available from the farm. I remember this, each year, watching the fields get wetter and colder, watching the storage crops dwindle, witnessing the end of the season AND starting to think about the seed order. I am beginning to look back at the 2014 season AND look ahead to the 2015 season; gauge our successes and failures, assess our situation financial and otherwise AND plan for the coming year with a sense of hope and optimism.

Solstice: from the Latin for sun and ‘to stand still’. So I think we do, stand still that is, this time of year. We stand and look back and look forward, we reflect and plan.

And here is to this season bringing peace and satisfaction.

Enjoy your Solstice,

Mike

PS: there are just too many good recipes to list. I have included two of my favorites for this time of year. Our website has so many more, and they are so easy to search by ingredient. Please take advantage of these and enjoy your holiday meals!

October 30th, 2014

Summer 2014 – week 20

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Chioggia Beets, Carrots, Garlic, Yellow Onions, Italian Parsley,
Mixed Peppers, Carnival Squash, Pears

Small shares:
Chioggia Beets, Carrots, Garlic, Red Russian Kale,
Yellow Onions, Italian Parsley, Mixed Peppers,
Carnival Squash, Pears
Family shares:
Chioggia Beets, Carrots, Garlic, Red Russian Kale,
Yellow Onions, Italian Parsley, Mixed Peppers,
Carnival Squash, Pears

Dear Friends,
Here we are at the last week of the Summer season. This is always a balancing act between the unbridled joy of a more relaxed schedule, and the very real feeling of sorrow. You will be missed. The CSA is a tangible way of connecting with our customers, and at the end of the day it is that connection that we value above all else. So let’s’ not say goodbye, but rather, see you later.
This week, we have included parsley and kale to round out our heartier offerings of winter squash, carrots and beets. The Chioggia Beets inconspicuously dull exterior hides a brilliant candy-striping of burgundy and white underneath. These can be sliced in salads for color and crunch or roasted with a bit of olive oil and garlic for a simple side dish; or you can include them in the Beet and Orzo recipe below. We have also included a healthy dose of mixed peppers, because they were just too beautiful not to share.

The garlic, our beautiful signature Carpathian, is included gratis. We cannot guarantee it free of mold. We have been growing this variety from our own seed since 1993. I thought we could outrun this issue by careful selection of seed stock, but it has gotten worse instead of better. We will carefully sort once more and plant only the best of the best. I am hopeful we can select this out, but even if we do, it may be two years or more before we have a marketable quantity again.

Also please note that we have placed this week’s flowers; a bouquet of dried Statice, inside the box itself.

We would like to thank you for accompanying us on this portion of our farming journey. This is the time to pause and appreciate you, our members. It is your support and faith in us that makes what we do possible, and we are humbly grateful.

We hope that you will continue to join us for this upcoming winter season. Please follow the link and consider signing up. This includes our Holiday Boxes in November and December, plus 10 deliveries from January through May: http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/2014-2015-winter-share-nov-may-C5635

Thanks again for a great season!
-Emily, with a bit from Mike