summer18

Summer 2014 – Week 18

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Carrots, Celeriac, Garlic, Acorn Squash,
Fingerling Potatoes & 1 Carving Pumpkin
Small shares:
Carrots, Beans, Edamame, Celeriac,  Garlic,
Acorn Squash, Fingerling Potatoes & 1 Carving Pumpkin
Family shares:
Carrots, Beans, Chard, Celeriac, Garlic,
Green Peppers, Acorn Squash,
Fingerling Potatoes & 1 Carving Pumpkin

 

October 14, 2014

Please Remember to take 1 Carving Pumpkin

Dear Friends,

I am amazed that we are already halfway through October and how quickly the summer CSA season is winding down.  As the weather cools, the body starts to crave the heartier foods that sustain us through the colder times.  This week’s box offers just that kind of warming, nourishing goodness – Acorn squash, carrots and Fingerling potatoes.  And in keeping with the season, instead of flowers this week, we are including a carving pumpkin.

You will find celeriac in your boxes as well.  Celeriac is a member of the celery family, but it has been bred over the centuries to produce a large root that will hold through the winter.  It has the flavor of  celery, though milder, and the consistency of a potato.  It is delicious cooked like a potato, or included in stews and curries.  It is also surprisingly good raw, sliced as crudités with hummus or another dip.  But many of us love it best when roasted in the oven, either alone or with other root vegetables.

Also of note this time of year: the salmon are spawning this week on the Chehalis River.  Boistfort Valley Farm sits on the South Fork of the Chehalis.  I walked down to the riverbank a few minutes ago, to see if I could see them. They are not here yet–they will be later this week.  Here at Boistfort Valley Farm we are certified Salmon-safe.  This is a certification for farms whose land lies along a waterway in which salmon make their yearly run.  To be ‘Salmon-safe Certified’ means that we adhere to a very stringent set of guidelines which protect the habitat of the river, and therefore, the salmon.  As an organic and environmentally-friendly farm, knowing that the salmon are making their yearly run brings a sense of satisfaction.

Once again, I would like to remind you of our upcoming Winter season.  Please follow the link and consider signing up.  This includes our Holiday Boxes in November and December, plus 10 deliveries from January through May:

http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/2014-2015-winter-share-nov-may-C5635

Thanks again!

-Emily

Summer 2014 – Week 12

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Snow peas, Celery, Cherry Tomato,
Sweet Corn, Purplette Onions,
Summer Squash, Cucumbers,
Thai Basil, Jalapenos & 1 Bunch of Flowers
Small shares:
Snow peas, Celery, Purplette Onions,
Cherry Tomato, Chard,Sweet Corn,
Eggplant, Cucumbers, Thai Basil,
Jalapenos & 1 Bunch of Flowers
Family shares:
Snow peas, Celery, Walla Walla Spring Onions,
Broccoli, Cherry Tomato, Chard, Sweet Corn,
Eggplant, Cucumbers, Thai Basil,
Jalapenos & 1 Bunch of Flowers
Please remember to take: 1 Bunch of Flowers

 
Dear Friends,

Nothing says ‘summer’ quite like ears of sweet corn: buttery, salty, and delicious.  Here at the Farm, our corn crop is in full harvest, and we are thrilled to add it to this week’s delivery. For me, the first ripe ear of corn is rivaled only by the first ripe strawberry, and I am glad they don’t happen at the same time. I could never choose.

Sweet corn, though it has become a bit of a novelty in our modern culture, has an ancient history of necessity for the Latin American world.  Originating as a wild grass in southern Mexico, it was first domesticated between 9000 and 8000 B.C.  By 1500 B.C. it had become an essential part of the diet and culture of the Olmecs and Mayans, who used it for food, medicine, and utilitarian purposes such as baskets and moccasins.

When purchasing sweet corn seed, today’s farmer has myriad choices. Corn has been bred perhaps more than any other plant. There are super sweets, sugar enhanced, super sugar enhanced… and those are just the descriptors. Then one has to choose color, finishing date, and too many other characteristics to mention.  While we love the ‘sweetness’ of corn, we also value traditional corn flavor, and choose varieties that have a flavor that is not overshadowed by pure sticky sweetness.

This year at Boistfort Valley Farm, we are growing two varieties of sweet corn.  ‘Luscious’, an early bi-color and a new (to us) variety that replaces an old favorite, and ‘Bodacious’, a yellow sweet corn whose old-fashioned flavor is a real standout.

As always, thank you for choosing us to be your farmers.  Enjoy the bounty this week!

-Emily

Summer 2014 – Week 4

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Lettuce, Chard, Fennel, Red Radishes,
Garlic Scapes & 1 Lily Stem.
Small shares:
Lettuce, Arugula, Chard,Fennel,
Red Radishes, Garlic Scapes, Mint,
Cilantro, & 1 Lily Stem.
Family shares:
Lettuce, Arugula, Chard, Fennel,
Red Radishes, Garlic Scapes, Parsley,
Cilantro, Kohlrabi, Mint & 1 Lily Stem.

 

 

Please remember to take: 1 Stem of Lilies

Dear Friends,

Now that we are entering the balmy days of summer, new varieties of vegetables and herbs seem to be ripening on a daily basis.  Many of these are quite unique and worth mentioning for those who are new to them….Garlic Scapes, Arugula and Fennel, to name a few.  And to solve this problem of “What is THIS in my box?” I am beginning a weekly Facebook post entitled, ‘Weekly Veggie Catalog.’  This identifies each item in your box and provides a bit of history, nutrition information and preparation tips about it.  (Also, if you have not yet ‘liked’ us on Facebook, please do so!)  www.facebook.com/boistfortvalleyfarm

Along these lines, here is the link to our “Recipes” page on the Boistfort Valley Farm website.  This also includes recipes and information for each vegetable.  www.boistfortvalleyfarm.com/recipes

One of these distinctive vegetables I mentioned earlier is Fennel.  Fennel is a graceful-looking plant originating in the Mediterranean.  It has a long and rich history.  The Ancient Greek Athletes used Fennel to stave off hunger during their fasting and training periods.  It is recorded that the Battle of Marathon during the Persian Wars (490 B.C.) was fought on a field of Fennel.  Later, Fennel seed was included as one of the key ingredients in Absinthe and enjoyed by the 18th Century Europeans.  Today, we use the Fennel bulb for cooking and in salads.  Both the bulb and the feathery leaves impart a sweet, refreshing flavor to salads and stir fries.  The roasted Fennel dish below looks amazing!

As always, we hope you enjoy your produce this week.  In next week’s box, we anticipate including the first carrots of the season.

For interested friends and family, please remember that it is not too late to sign up for a farm share.  We consider ourselves fortunate to provide your family with the bounty of our farm.

–Emily

One note on the included flowers:  When taking your lilies, please be gentle with the ones you are leaving for other members.  They are easily damaged from excessive handling.  Thank you!