Winter 2016 CSA - week 4

Winter 2016 – Week 4

What’s in the box?

*Fingerling potatoes, *Orange Carrots, *Purple Carrots, *Swiss Chard, *Red Russian Kale, *Leeks, *Savoy Cabbage, *Baking Potatoes, Yellow Onions, Sunchokes, Parsnips, Cameo Apples, D’Anjou Pears, Baby Boc Choy, Black Sheep Creamery Cheese
*grown on our farm

 

PLEASE TAKE ONE PACKAGE OF CHEESE.
Cheese is packed separately from your veggies to keep it cold.

We are delighted to have a variety of vegetables from our farm once again this week, plus a smattering of other Northwest goodies.  One of the more unusual selections today is the bag of Jerusalem Artichokes, also known as sunchokes.  Sunchokes, or Helianthus tuberosus, are related to sunflowers, and sport a mildly artichoke-like flavor that helps give them their name.  They are known both to be delicious raw AND to cause stomach rumbling/gas when consumed raw, so I leave it to you to determine how you will eat them.  I have included a recipe for cooked sunchokes below.

I’ve marked all items from our farm with an asterisk (*).  The other produce is certified organic and grown as indicated in the list on the left.  We do have one California item this delivery, to my dismay.  I try to keep the boxes as local as possible, but we just don’t have the temperatures to launch the  next season of veggies the way we’d like to, and it’s a fine dance between giving you a variety of greens and roots, and keeping it close to home.  Thanks for your understanding, and if you’re okay with more beets, rutabaga & potatoes, don’t hesitate to let us know!

As always, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

Yours,
Heidi

 

 

Sunchoke and Potato Gratin
Adapted from First Look, Then Cook: http://firstlookthencook.com/2010/02/07/sunchoke-and-potato-gratin/

2 shallots, sliced thin
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp olive oil, plus more to grease pan
1 Tbsp butter
10 sunchokes (about golf-ball sized), peeled, sliced thin
2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and sliced thin
1/4 cup milk
1 cup Black Sheep Creamery cheese
Pinch of nutmeg
Salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Add 1 tsp olive oil and 1 Tbsp butter to skillet.  Add shallot and sauté over medium heat, careful not to brown heavily.  When shallot is translucent, add garlic cloves; cook until just fragrant.  Remove from heat.

Grease a 9×9 ceramic dish lightly with olive oil. Layer the potatoes evenly in the dish covering the entire bottom.  Sprinkle with nutmeg, salt and pepper.  Layer the sunchokes evenly covering the potatoes.  Sprinkle the shallot/garlic mixture on top of the sunchokes – and sprinkle again with salt and pepper.  Pour milk all over the vegetables.  Sprinkle with the cheese.

Cover the dish with tin foil and bake for about 45 minutes.  Take the cover off and bake for an additional 15 minutes.  Make sure the sunchokes are soft – if not cook a little longer.

Ginger/Garlic Savoy Cabbage
from: http://www.food.com/recipe/ginger-garlic-savoy-cabbage-15832

1 head savoy cabbage (about 1 1/2 lbs), cored, shredded across in approx 3/4-inch slices
2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 Tablespoon minced garlic
Salt & pepper
1 1/4 Tablespoons ginger, minced
Juice of 1 lime
Heat wok or large skillet medium high heat, wait until oil is hot.  Add cabbage and stir fry until cabbage just starts to wilt (do nor overcook).  Add garlic, salt and pepper cook 1 minute.  Add ginger cook 1 minute.  Drizzle with lime juice and serve.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/220583/glazed-carrots-and-parsnips-with-chives/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=8

Simple Parsnip Pancakes
Adapted from recipe by Catherine Boynton: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/239758/simple-parsnip-pancakes/?internalSource=recipe%20hub&referringId=2449&referringContentType=recipe%20hub

1 cup grated scrubbed parsnips
2 eggs
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1 Tablespoon olive oil
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
Ground black pepper to taste (optional)
2 teaspoons sunflower oil, or more as needed
Combine parsnips, eggs, onion, olive oil, salt, rosemary, and black pepper together in a bowl until batter is combined and lumpy.
Heat sunflower oil in a heavy frying pan over medium heat. Spoon batter into oil and fry until pancakes are brown and crispy on the edges, 6 to 7 minutes per side.

Winter 2016 CSA - Week 2

Winter 2016 – Week 2

What’s in the Box:

*Swiss Chard, *Kale-Purple, *Carrots , *Rutabaga, *Baking potatoes,
*Leeks, *Garlic, *Thyme, Yellow Onions (WA O), Parsnips (OR O),
Shallots (WA O), Fuji Apples (WA O), D’Anjou Pears (WA O),
Black Sheep Creamery Cheese (Adna, WA)
*grown on our farm

PLEASE TAKE ONE PACKAGE OF CHEESE.
Cheese is packed separately from your veggies to keep it cold.

Greetings from the Boistfort Valley!  The sunny weather has made me grateful and itchy to get outside and work, but the temperature fluctuations remind me of our reality.  Still, it’s nice to go out and trim back the perennials that escaped our attention during the busy seasons, soaking up a little sunshine as a side bonus.

I’ve marked all items from our farm with an asterisk (*).  The other produce is certified organic, Washington or Oregon grown.

Our cheese selection is from Black Sheep Creamery, located about 10 miles from us in Adna, Washington. Brad and Meg Gregory have owned the farm since 1992, and began making cheese over 10 years ago.  They just opened a retail store in downtown Chehalis, so if you’re in the area, stop in to say hello and to try a variety of their products.

“Bastille” cheese is aged two months and tastes young and creamy.  It is a washed curd, Sheep Cow Blend which is quite delicious.  Read more about Black Sheep Creamery, and see the sheep (and lambs!) at their website: http://blacksheepcreamery.com/

As always, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

Yours,
Heidi

 

 

 

Roasted Parsnips Recipe

Adapted from: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/roasted_parsnips/

1 1/2 pounds of parsnips, scrubbed, quartered lengthwise, cut into sticks (think French fry size)

1 generous Tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

Salt and freshly ground pepper

1/3 cup of low sodium vegetable broth
3 Tablespoons butter, softened

4 teaspoons drained, bottled horseradish (how to make homemade horseradish)

2 teaspoons finely chopped parsley or thyme (stems removed)

1 garlic clove, minced.

Pre-heat oven to 400°F. In a large roasting pan, toss the parsnips with olive oil, salt and pepper.  Add the broth, cover and roast, stirring once or twice, until the parsnips are just tender and the stock has evaporated or been absorbed, 20-30 minutes. Remove cover and allow liquid to evaporate and parsnips to brown slightly in places.  Depending on your oven, you may have to broil them briefly to avoid overcooking.

Combine the softened butter with the horseradish, parsley, chives and garlic and season with salt and pepper. Toss the warm roasted parsnips with the horseradish-herb butter and serve.

Leek and Root Vegetable Gratin
Adapted from http://www.recipe.com/leek-and-root-vegetable-gratin/

8 ounces Gruyere or Muenster cheese, shredded (2 cups)

1 Tablespoon finely chopped thyme and/or parsley

1 Tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

2 large rutabaga (about 1 lb.), peeled and thinly sliced

1 pound baking potatoes, scrubbed and thinly sliced

2-3 leeks (2 cups), cleaned and thinly sliced

1 pound large parsnips, peeled and thinly sliced (you received 1 1/2 lbs)

1 1/2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced

Assorted fresh herbs for garnish (optional)
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. In small bowl toss together cheese and chopped herbs; set aside. Coat a 3 qt. rectangular baking dish with olive oil. Layer half the turnip slices on the bottom of the dish, sprinkling salt, pepper, and 3 to 4 tablespoons the cheese mixture.  Follow with half the potato slices, half the leek slices, half the parsnip slices, and half the sweet potato slices, seasoning and adding cheese to each layer. Repeat, ending with sweet potato slices. Reserve remaining cheese mixture.

Cover with foil. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes. Remove foil. Sprinkle remaining cheese mixture over top. Increase oven temperature to 400 degrees F. Continue baking, uncovered, 15 minutes or until cheese is melted and starting to brown.

Remove from oven. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.


Pears with Bastille, Leeks and Fresh Thyme

Don’t layer your pears too much-you want them to get a little crispy around the edges.  If you don’t have the time to put this into the oven, just slice up the cheese and the pears and eat them together.

1 small leek, cleaned, stem sliced into thin coins

1 Tablespoon butter

1 medium D’Anjou pear

6-8 thin slices Black Sheep Creamery Bastille Cheese

A handful of sprigs of thyme

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Sauté the leek gently in butter, until soft and slightly browned in places, about 5 minutes. Slice the pear into thin slices (about 8 slices, keeping the odd bits to eat as you go).  Grease a glass baking dish with a bit of butter, and lay the pear slices in a single layer.  Top each pear with 1 slice of cheese and lay thyme across crosswise.  Bake, uncovered at 350 for 25 minutes, or until cheese is bubbly and pears are soft and a little crispy at the edges.  You may finish these with a quick broil to brown a bit.  (Note: thyme stems aren’t to be eaten)

Winter 2016 CSA - week 1

Winter 2016 – Week 1

What’s in the Box:

*Savoy Cabbage, *Kale-Curly , *Parsley-Curly , *Carnival squash,
*Baking potatoes, *Austrian Crescent potatoes, *Golden Beets,
*Leeks, *Carrots-Purple & Orange, Braeburn Apples, D’Anjou Pears
Santa Lucia Coffee

*grown on our farm

Happy New Year!  We have a variety of lovely produce for the deliveries this week.  All items with an asterisk (*) are from our farm.  The other produce is certified organic, Washington grown (this is, the apples and pears).

As a reminder, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website orcontact us at the farm.

The cold temperatures and the snow have kept us out of the field for the last little bit, but they didn’t do much damage to the Winter veggies.  The snow especially delighted Natty, who was out there throwing snowballs morning and night, much to the displeasure of our Labrador, Dinah.  Snowballs, unlike tennis balls, explode on impact, and Dinah learned this the first time she caught one in her mouth.  She spent the rest of the day lurking on the porch, staring out the window, presumably waiting for the snow to melt.
Well, melt it did, but it’s been quite icy in the mornings, and we step carefully around the farm to keep from slipping and sliding, especially with loads of produce.  We are looking forward to the warmer rainy weather we were promised by the folks who study these things. Please be careful out there when picking up your boxes!

We have a special treat in the boxes today: a locally roasted coffee provided by our favorite roasters and friends at Santa Lucia Coffee Roasters, Justin and Lucy Page.  Here’s a little something that Justin sent me about the coffee included with your produce:

The San Rafael Urias farm rests on the side of a small mountain in the valley of San Miguel Duenas, Antigua. It is shadowed by the Agua (Water) and Fuego (Fire) volcanoes. Founded by Rafael Valdes Quiroa in the late 1880s, it is now owned and managed by the third generation of the family, headed by Don Isidro Valdes.  Workers on the farm are allowed to grow their own crops in these areas. There is also some land reserved as forest, providing a sanctuary for migrant birds.

San Rafael is also benefited by small natural springs, which give clean drinking water and irrigation for the seedlings in the nursery. They have now piped this spring over 1.5km to their mill and use it for the washing and pulping of the cherries (the raw coffee beans). The farm is also next to the Guacalote River, which is used to provide hydraulic energy to the coffee mill.

This is a genuine Antigua coffee as certified by the APCA, the genuine Antigua Coffee Growers Association. The APCA was created by local producers in 2000 to protect the ‘Antigua’ reputation. Unfortunately, many lesser quality Guatemalan coffees were sold under this prestigious name and it became damaging for the true local producers. The APCA have gone on to help other growers in the area with training and support to further their craft. Enjoy!
Yours,
Heidi

 

 

 

Cabbage Fried Rice
Adapted from: http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/cabbage-fried-rice

2 Tablespoons vegetable oil

1 leek, halved or quartered lengthwise, cut into 1/4-inch slices

1 cup thinly sliced or julienned carrots

4 cups shredded Savoy cabbage

2 garlic cloves, minced

2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger

1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice

4 large eggs, beaten

2 Tablespoons soy sauce

Juice of 1 lime
2 scallions, thinly sliced
Cook rice in a pot of boiling salted water until al dente.  Drain immediately.
In a nonstick wok or large skillet, heat the oil. Add the leek, carrots and cabbage and stir-fry over high heat until the vegetables are softened and beginning to brown, about 7 minutes. Add the garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the rice and stir-fry until heated through and beginning to brown, about 3 minutes.

Push the fried rice to the side of the pan to create a well. Pour the eggs into the well and cook, stirring gently, until nearly cooked. Toss the fried rice with the eggs and cook for 1 minute longer. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the soy sauce, lime juice and scallions. Transfer the fried rice to bowls and serve.

Warm Golden Beet Salad with Greens and Almonds
Adapted from: http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-warm-golden-beet-salad-116139

1 ½ lbs golden beets (you received 2 lbs total in your share)
½ bunch of kale
Olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 cloves garlic, minced
4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
2/3 cup toasted almond slivers
Heat the oven to 425°F. Line a 9-inch square baking pan or cake tin with a big square of foil, large enough to complete enclose the beet roots. Lightly rinse the beet roots to remove any really clumpy dirt and pat them dry. Place them in the foil square and lightly drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle generously with salt and pepper. Fold up the foil and crease to seal. Bake the beets for 60 minutes or until they can be just pierced with a fork. Set aside to cool.
Meanwhile, strip the kale leaves from the stems, and chop leaves into bite-size ribbons. Rinse thoroughly. Discard stems. In a large skillet, heat a drizzle of olive oil over medium heat; add garlic. Cook on low for about 2 minutes or until garlic is golden and fragrant. Add kale leaves and stir to coat. Cook on medium-low for about 10 minutes or until leaves are soft and tender. Add a bit of water if needed to keep the kale from drying out/scorching. Remove from heat.
When the beets are cool, remove skins (they should slip off easily). Chop beets into bite-sized pieces and toss with the cooked greens, goat cheese, and almonds. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve warm or cold.

Winter 2014 – February, week 2

What’s in the Box:

Carrots, Purple Carrots,
Parsnips, Leeks, Fuji apples, D’Anjou pears,
Shiitake mushrooms, Red cipollini onions,
Shallots, Red potatoes & OlyKraut sauerkraut

Dear Members,

I’d like to introduce myself as the newest member of the BVF team.  My name is Kathryn and I am the new Production Manager here.  Over the years, I have bounced back and forth between Vermont, Montana, and the Northwest.  My background is in organic vegetable and seed farming and I spent the past few years working in my home state of Vermont for an organic seed company. I’m happy to have returned to the Northwest and am busy integrating into this great place.  Rachel, Mike, and Bj have all been getting me up to speed, and I look forward to making connections with you all as well!

I’ve just returned to the office after a lovely few hours of seeding in the greenhouse.  The clouds broke every so often that it warmed up to a nice, humid 75 degrees, I’d guess.  The onions are looking tall, soft and a beautiful vibrant green while the celery, lettuces and artichokes are just beginning to show their first true leaves.  Today I seeded some of our first plantings of those cool-loving brassicas: broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and cabbage.  These crops all have lovely, hard, round seeds that never cease to enamor me with their subtle, varying shades of purples and reds.  I love spending the time in the greenhouse to get to really examine those tiny living spheres that will turn into our shared bounty in a few short months.

The same variety of cabbage that I seeded today is also featured in your box in the form of sauerkraut from OlyKraut.  Cabbages that are best used for sauerkraut are very dense with thin leaves and a blanched interior and this variety can grow up to 12 lbs.  We grow this cabbage exclusively for OlyKraut so we are happy to, in the depths of winter, be able to include it in your CSA box. Enjoy!

Kathryn

Winter 2014 – January, week 2

What’s in the Box:

Bulk beets*, Bulk carrots*,
Bulk purple carrots*, Leeks*,
Parsnips*, Yellow cipollini onions,
Purple fingerling potatoes,
d’Anjou pears, Gala apples
& St. Lucia Coffee
*From our farm

 

 

Dear Members,

Here’s hoping you have held on to some of that garlic, maybe even hung a bunch of our thyme in the kitchen where you can get it down for this week’s recipes. I love to cook, and I know I have said it before, but that is why I got into farming in the first place. Okay, right, first and foremost I love to eat therefore I have learned to love to cook. Nothing makes a great cook out of a fair one like the use of fresh local ingredients. I am thinking about cooking as I write because over the past few years there are two words which, for me, have become joined at the hip; baked and fruit. I probably did not bake an apple or pear until I was in my forties. My advice? Don’t wait that long, or if you have, don’t delay in trying it. I have included a very simple recipe for baked pears, but encourage anyone with a sense of adventure to try this: http://www.prouditaliancook.com/2013/10/ricotta-filled-baked-pears.html

We are still busy here at the farm. We are down to a skeleton crew with only two men in the field, and Rachel is often alone in the pack shed. We do try to cross train everyone and the field crew is generous with their time in helping Rachel when she needs it. Darren Johnson has taken the hot seat as our delivery driver, and has settled in well. I have traveled with Darren in an old mini-van full of children ranging in age from 14-5, he is a calm and capable driver and we are pleased to have his help. Say hi if you get a chance. Heidi and I have been working on the seed order and planning for next season. Then there are all the other year end responsibilities; taxes, compliance issues, and the like keeping Bj and me busy in the office; never a dull moment.

I so hope you are enjoying your deliveries. If so please talk us up and know that it is never too late to join for the remainder of the winter deliveries, nor too early to subscribe to our summer 2014 season. Our advertising will go out in early February. Current members will be able to join through the website by February 1.

Mike

 

A note about the Santa Lucia Coffee Roasters’ coffee included in your CSA box. St. Lucia is a local coffee roaster in Centralia, Washington, and we hope you love their coffee as much as we do. www.luciacoffee.com

Elegantly smooth and sweet, Finca Vista Hermosa embodies the essence of Guatemalan coffee. Exquisitely balanced you’ll find juicy orange citrus, bakers chocolate and hints of passion fruit in every cup. Family owned and operated the Martinez Family firmly believes: “if you can’t do it well, don’t do it at all.”  A 2007 Cup of Excellence winner, this exclusive testament to Guatemalan coffee is one worth experiencing.