2015_april_week1

Winter 2015 – April, Week 1

At a Glance:

*Italian Parsley, *Red Russian Kale, Fennel, *Beets
Cauliflower, *Leeks, Crimini Mushrooms, Turnips
*Yellow Potatoes, Onions, Braeburn Apples,
Black Sheep Creamery Fresh sheep’s cheese
*from our farm

 

 

Greetings Dear Friends,

We often hear from customers, “my (husband, wife, kids) claimed to hate (broccoli, beets, cauliflower) until they tried yours, but now they love them.” People form opinions based on experience. Unfortunately the experience of eating vegetables grown for shelf life rather than flavor is quite common. This can lead one to believe that they do not like something only because they have never tried it as it was intended. This may be understandable when it comes to the “general population”, but for me? Well, evidently I love collards. For years I considered them bitter and tough and largely useless, considering the performance and quality of kale and chard, but I get the CSA too. Every week there is a box delivered to my back door, and last week I sautéed the collard greens in bacon fat. It was marvelous. My seven year old daughter enjoyed them every bit as much as I, so much so that Heidi and I planned a kind of ‘Southern’ menu around collards and Teggia beans for Sunday Dinner.

This from Galilee in the pack shed: Parsley stems are gooood!!! “The parsley stems (extras I took home) are so incredibly delicious – sweet, succulent, aromatic, refreshing, even substantive!  They are my favorite snack right now.  To think….most people will throw them away….what a pity.  They reminded me of one of my favorite farm families in the valley where I grew up. They would often overwinter (no one else did this) a long row of parsley along the road to their house.  As we would walk to visit in the spring (no car in those days), I remember grazing and thinking the stems were really the best part…sometime scattering the tops Hansel and Gretel style as I walked.  Thanks!!”

Comments like these are common from our customers and I thought it remarkable to have this experience here too, among people whose lives rotate around produce. And ours do, our lives… they do rotate around the farm.

We are farmers, the real deal, and we are delighted to share our experience with you through the CSA. We have been offering this program since 1993, and have always recognized the value of directly connecting with our customers. Your interest and comments, your encouragement and praise, are the foundation of the CSA program. This connection with you has always been at the center of our conversations about the CSA, and about the farm.

It is important to us that you, our best customers, sign up for this season’s summer share. We will not be doing the same broad advertising we have in the past. We have opted to direct our energy toward strengthening the relationships we have instead of forming new ones with new customers. We are at a challenging stage of our evolution and your early commitment to our farm has never been more important. Your support will help ensure the continued success of Boistfort Valley Farm. Your participation will allow us to continue to do what we love most.

If you can commit now to the summer share please do (http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/store/ ), if you already have, thank you, really and truly.

Mike

Summer 2014 – Week 14

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Butterhead Lettuce, Fennel, Onions,
Cherry Tomatoes, Beans, Corn & 1 Drying Bouquet
Small shares:
Butterhead Lettuce, Fennel, Onions, Cherry Tomatoes,
Snow Peas, Corn, Eggplant & 1 Drying Bouquet
Family shares:
Butterhead Lettuce, Fennel, Onions, Beets, Beans,
Cherry Tomatoes, Peppers, Corn, Eggplant &
1 Drying Bouquet

 

September 18, 2014

Dear Friends,

Fall is in the air a little early this year – changing light, a light frost, bringing in the squashes.  This past week, while cutting sunflowers, I was blessed with the sight of several tiny frogs basking and hunting in the fall-like sun 4 feet off the ground on sturdy sunflower leaves.  Their green-bronze calmness was a stark contrast to the hustle and bustle of harvest, bunch, wash, pack, label, transport that is the standard rhythm here on the farm.  Both amaze me equally.

Since it is the time of year to stock up for winter, this week I have chosen to make a bouquet for you to DRY.  You will find it IN your box.  It is made from Ornamental Millet, Statice and Lavender.  To preserve it, you should hang it up in a dry place out of direct light for 2 weeks.  Then it will keep its color and lovely scent (the millet smells a bit like curry and maple syrup…) for years to come.  It is a bouquet best viewed from the “top”, so once you have dried it, I suggest placing it on its side in a bookshelf, china cabinet, desk organizer or basket of other summer memories.  I trust you will find the perfect place!

Enjoy the precious fall air,

Galilee – the “flower girl”

PS: Look forward to forthcoming information about signing up for our holiday and winter season CSA! The Email to current members will be going out this week!

Summer 2014 – Week 7

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Lettuce, Radicchio, Purple Carrots, English Shell Peas,
Apricots, Basil & 4 Stems of Flowers.
Small shares:
Lettuce, Radicchio, Purple Carrots, Fennel,
English Shell Peas, Green Onions,
Apricots & 4 Stems of Flowers.
Family shares:
Lettuce, Purple Carrots, Fennel, Summer  Squash,
English Shell Peas, Green Onions,
Apricots & 4 Stems of Flowers.

 

Please remember to take: 4 Stems of Flowers

Dear Friends,

It looks like the warm weather is back after last week’s reprieve of clouds and so much rain.  These long, sultry days of sunshine make for thriving plants and luscious produce.  Some of the radicchio grown here at the farm is the largest I have ever seen.

In your boxes this week you will find peas!!  Tender and sweet, fresh English Shell Peas add sparkle to any meal, if they actually make it INTO the meal; ours usually get eaten by the handful long before, on par with any berry! They do need to be shelled mind you; which is as easy as running your thumb nail along the length of the union of the two halves of the shell on the inside edge of the pod. The pod will open like a book revealing the peas within.

We also have apricots to offer this week, which are a real treat.  Apricots are at their peak right now and these are the Rival variety and grown right here in Washington state.  Apricots are just one more of the highlights of midsummer.

Speaking of fruit, if you and your family crave more than we deliver in our regular Summer share boxes, Our Fruit Shares have been well received and there are some still available.  These come on a weekly basis and consists of a variety of seasonal fruits.  Even though we began offering the Fruit share a couple of weeks ago, when you sign up your payment is pro-rated, just like the regular Summer Share.

As always, thank you for being our partners in this farming experience and accompanying us on this season’s journey of planting, growing, harvesting, sharing and eating.  Have a wonderful week!

Emily

A couple of notes on the included flowers:

When taking your Glads, please be gentle with the ones you are leaving for other members.  They are easily damaged.

Summer 2014 – Week 4

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Lettuce, Chard, Fennel, Red Radishes,
Garlic Scapes & 1 Lily Stem.
Small shares:
Lettuce, Arugula, Chard,Fennel,
Red Radishes, Garlic Scapes, Mint,
Cilantro, & 1 Lily Stem.
Family shares:
Lettuce, Arugula, Chard, Fennel,
Red Radishes, Garlic Scapes, Parsley,
Cilantro, Kohlrabi, Mint & 1 Lily Stem.

 

 

Please remember to take: 1 Stem of Lilies

Dear Friends,

Now that we are entering the balmy days of summer, new varieties of vegetables and herbs seem to be ripening on a daily basis.  Many of these are quite unique and worth mentioning for those who are new to them….Garlic Scapes, Arugula and Fennel, to name a few.  And to solve this problem of “What is THIS in my box?” I am beginning a weekly Facebook post entitled, ‘Weekly Veggie Catalog.’  This identifies each item in your box and provides a bit of history, nutrition information and preparation tips about it.  (Also, if you have not yet ‘liked’ us on Facebook, please do so!)  www.facebook.com/boistfortvalleyfarm

Along these lines, here is the link to our “Recipes” page on the Boistfort Valley Farm website.  This also includes recipes and information for each vegetable.  www.boistfortvalleyfarm.com/recipes

One of these distinctive vegetables I mentioned earlier is Fennel.  Fennel is a graceful-looking plant originating in the Mediterranean.  It has a long and rich history.  The Ancient Greek Athletes used Fennel to stave off hunger during their fasting and training periods.  It is recorded that the Battle of Marathon during the Persian Wars (490 B.C.) was fought on a field of Fennel.  Later, Fennel seed was included as one of the key ingredients in Absinthe and enjoyed by the 18th Century Europeans.  Today, we use the Fennel bulb for cooking and in salads.  Both the bulb and the feathery leaves impart a sweet, refreshing flavor to salads and stir fries.  The roasted Fennel dish below looks amazing!

As always, we hope you enjoy your produce this week.  In next week’s box, we anticipate including the first carrots of the season.

For interested friends and family, please remember that it is not too late to sign up for a farm share.  We consider ourselves fortunate to provide your family with the bounty of our farm.

–Emily

One note on the included flowers:  When taking your lilies, please be gentle with the ones you are leaving for other members.  They are easily damaged from excessive handling.  Thank you!