Winter 2016 CSA - week 4

Winter 2016 – Week 4

What’s in the box?

*Fingerling potatoes, *Orange Carrots, *Purple Carrots, *Swiss Chard, *Red Russian Kale, *Leeks, *Savoy Cabbage, *Baking Potatoes, Yellow Onions, Sunchokes, Parsnips, Cameo Apples, D’Anjou Pears, Baby Boc Choy, Black Sheep Creamery Cheese
*grown on our farm

 

PLEASE TAKE ONE PACKAGE OF CHEESE.
Cheese is packed separately from your veggies to keep it cold.

We are delighted to have a variety of vegetables from our farm once again this week, plus a smattering of other Northwest goodies.  One of the more unusual selections today is the bag of Jerusalem Artichokes, also known as sunchokes.  Sunchokes, or Helianthus tuberosus, are related to sunflowers, and sport a mildly artichoke-like flavor that helps give them their name.  They are known both to be delicious raw AND to cause stomach rumbling/gas when consumed raw, so I leave it to you to determine how you will eat them.  I have included a recipe for cooked sunchokes below.

I’ve marked all items from our farm with an asterisk (*).  The other produce is certified organic and grown as indicated in the list on the left.  We do have one California item this delivery, to my dismay.  I try to keep the boxes as local as possible, but we just don’t have the temperatures to launch the  next season of veggies the way we’d like to, and it’s a fine dance between giving you a variety of greens and roots, and keeping it close to home.  Thanks for your understanding, and if you’re okay with more beets, rutabaga & potatoes, don’t hesitate to let us know!

As always, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

Yours,
Heidi

 

 

Sunchoke and Potato Gratin
Adapted from First Look, Then Cook: http://firstlookthencook.com/2010/02/07/sunchoke-and-potato-gratin/

2 shallots, sliced thin
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp olive oil, plus more to grease pan
1 Tbsp butter
10 sunchokes (about golf-ball sized), peeled, sliced thin
2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and sliced thin
1/4 cup milk
1 cup Black Sheep Creamery cheese
Pinch of nutmeg
Salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Add 1 tsp olive oil and 1 Tbsp butter to skillet.  Add shallot and sauté over medium heat, careful not to brown heavily.  When shallot is translucent, add garlic cloves; cook until just fragrant.  Remove from heat.

Grease a 9×9 ceramic dish lightly with olive oil. Layer the potatoes evenly in the dish covering the entire bottom.  Sprinkle with nutmeg, salt and pepper.  Layer the sunchokes evenly covering the potatoes.  Sprinkle the shallot/garlic mixture on top of the sunchokes – and sprinkle again with salt and pepper.  Pour milk all over the vegetables.  Sprinkle with the cheese.

Cover the dish with tin foil and bake for about 45 minutes.  Take the cover off and bake for an additional 15 minutes.  Make sure the sunchokes are soft – if not cook a little longer.

Ginger/Garlic Savoy Cabbage
from: http://www.food.com/recipe/ginger-garlic-savoy-cabbage-15832

1 head savoy cabbage (about 1 1/2 lbs), cored, shredded across in approx 3/4-inch slices
2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 Tablespoon minced garlic
Salt & pepper
1 1/4 Tablespoons ginger, minced
Juice of 1 lime
Heat wok or large skillet medium high heat, wait until oil is hot.  Add cabbage and stir fry until cabbage just starts to wilt (do nor overcook).  Add garlic, salt and pepper cook 1 minute.  Add ginger cook 1 minute.  Drizzle with lime juice and serve.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/220583/glazed-carrots-and-parsnips-with-chives/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=8

Simple Parsnip Pancakes
Adapted from recipe by Catherine Boynton: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/239758/simple-parsnip-pancakes/?internalSource=recipe%20hub&referringId=2449&referringContentType=recipe%20hub

1 cup grated scrubbed parsnips
2 eggs
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1 Tablespoon olive oil
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
Ground black pepper to taste (optional)
2 teaspoons sunflower oil, or more as needed
Combine parsnips, eggs, onion, olive oil, salt, rosemary, and black pepper together in a bowl until batter is combined and lumpy.
Heat sunflower oil in a heavy frying pan over medium heat. Spoon batter into oil and fry until pancakes are brown and crispy on the edges, 6 to 7 minutes per side.

Winter 2016 - Week 3

Winter 2016 – Week 3

What’s in the Box:

*Austrian Crescent potatoes
*Carrots-purple
*Red Russian Kale
*Leeks
*Red Cabbage
*Beets
*Parsley
*Dry Beans
Yellow & Red Cipollini Onions (WA)
Ruby Crescent Potatoes (OR)
Enterprise Apples (WA)
Red D’Anjou Pears (WA)
Shiitake Mushrooms (OR)

*grown on our farm

Dear Members,

I know that you all must get tired of me talking about the weather, but let me just say this: WOOOOOOOWWWWW!!

Natty insisted on going out in shorts and a t-shirt yesterday, and then going to the river, which lasted until her feet got cold (about 5 minutes).  Even still, we’re grateful for the Vitamin D. I hope you’re getting a little sunshine on this lovely day.

We have included my favorite dry beans today-a cranberry type bean that is the creamiest most delicious bean ever.  I have included a simple recipe below, but feel free to substitute them in any recipe that calls for dried beans.  My only advice is not to overcook them if you prefer a firm bean-they will become soft and break down if overcooked.
I’ve marked all items from our farm with an asterisk (*).  The other produce is certified organic, Washington or Oregon grown as indicated in the list on the left.

As always, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

Yours,
Heidi

Pack and Go Lunch: Tangled Red Cabbage Salad
Adapted from:  http://www.theclevercarrot.com/2016/01/pack-and-go-lunch-tangled-red-cabbage-salad/
Author: Emilie Raffa (recipe adapted from Heike on Instagram)

For the Dressing
1 tbsp all-natural creamy peanut butter
1 tbsp rice wine vinegar or white vinegar
1 tsp soy sauce
the juice of ½ lime
1 tsp honey, plus more to taste
2 tbsp coconut milk
1 tbsp hot water
dash of hot sauce

For the Salad
1 small red cabbage, sliced paper thin
2 cups shredded kale
2 scallions, white & light green part only, thinly sliced
1-2 clementines, peeled and sliced into wheels
¼ cups pomegranate seeds
1 serving cooked black rice soba noodles (optional)
1 tsp white sesame seeds (optional)

Add all of the dressing ingredients to a small bowl. Whisk until well blended.

To prepare the salad, add the cabbage, kale and scallions to a large bowl. Pour a little bit of the dressing over the top and toss well. Marinate for 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, if using soba noodles, cook them according to the package directions. When finished, rinse under cold water. Drain well and add to the salad.

To finish, add the clementine wheels, pomegranate seeds and sesame seeds (if using). Add additional dressing and toss well to combine. Taste, and add more lime juice as needed.

Serve at room temperature.
Shiitake Angel Hair Pasta
Adapted from: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/11706/shiitake-angel-hair-pasta/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=4 Recipe By:Ann

6 ounces angel hair pasta
6 ounces fresh sliced shiitake mushrooms
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 small onion, chopped
1/4 cup white wine
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 Tablespoon butter
1/4 cup chicken or vegetable broth, preferably low sodium
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
salt to taste
ground black pepper to taste
2 Tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Sauté onion in olive oil and butter over medium heat until soft and translucent.  Add garlic and sauté until just fragrant, then add mushrooms and brown lightly. Add chicken stock and wine, and cook until mixture is reduced to 1/2 volume. Blend in cream, and reduce to desired thickness. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water until al dente.  Drain pasta, and toss with sauce until coated. Serve on small warmed plates, topped with grated Parmesan cheese and parsley.

Simple Beans
To be used as a side with cotija cheese, or served with chips, on tortillas with cheese and toppings, or as desired. If cooking for soup, just cut the cumin and cilantro.

1 1/2 cups dry beans
1 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp coriander
1/2 tsp garlic powder (fresh, high quality — otherwise use more)
1 heaping tsp dried cilantro leaves
1/2 tsp salt

Sort dry beans. Rinse thoroughly and pour into a medium pot. Add water to at least two inches above the level of the beans. Soak overnight OR bring to a boil for approximately 5 minutes, then remove from heat. Let stand one hour.
Once beans have been soaked, or boiled and soaked, pour out water and refill with new, again two inches over the level of the beans. Bring to a boil and add seasonings, but not salt. Simmer until liquid is reduced and beans are soft and creamy, one hour or longer. Add salt and additional seasonings as desired.

 

holidaybox_2015

Holiday Box – December 2015

What’s in the Box:

Green & Purple kohlrabi,
Delicata squash, Carnival squash, Mystery Winter squash
Baking potatoes, Austrian Crescent Potatoes
Leeks, Purple Carrots, Orange Carrots
Beets, Red Russian Kale
Parsley, Honey Crisp Apples
Farm honey

Tomorrow (Tuesday) is the second and final holiday box.  For our Summer members, this is the final box that you will receive as part of your 2015 Summer share.  If you haven’t signed up for our Winter season yet, please consider joining us for January through March! http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/store/

If you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

This delivery’s boxes include a variety of produce from our farm, as well as Washington gorwn organic honey crisp apples and honey from hives that spent the Summer in our fields.  Please note that the honey tends to crystallize quickly, particularly in cooler temperatures.  Crystallization doesn’t affect the quality of the honey or its flavor, and it can be used as-is or decrystallized in a warm water bath.  I do not recommend microwaving the plastic containers. Also note that it is not recommended to give infants under one year of age any honey, raw or processed.  More information and general honey facts are at: http://www.honey.com/faq/

If you’d like more honey, we have some available for purchase on the website too! Please note that you must have an active subscription to purchase honey and other add-on items. http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/store/ (scroll down for Add-ons)

Enjoy!
Heidi
Kohlrabi, Apple, and Carrot Salad with Honey Mustard Dressing
Recipe adapted slightly from The Table: http://www.thetableblog.com/2013/06/kohlrabi-apple-and-carrot-salad/#.Vm9wcb-yqpM

2 Kohlrabi
1 Apple, preferably a tart green one
2 Carrots
1 1/2 Tbsp Honey
1  1/2 Tbsp Grainy Mustard
5 Tbsp Olive Oil
2 Tbsp White Wine Vinegar

Peel the kohlrabi, then slice and cut into matchsticks. Wash the carrots and cut them into matchsticks as well, or as close to matchsticks as possible. (Mine were short and chubby so this was a challenge.) Next, slice the apple and also cut it into matchsticks. You can peel the apple if you wish, but I didn’t.

In a small jar, add all the dressing ingredients (honey through vinegar). Screw the lid on and shake till well mixed. If you don’t have a jar, you can use a bowl and a whisk, but I highly recommend saving a jar or two for making homemade dressing. So easy! Taste the dressing and add more honey or mustard to taste. Then toss all together and enjoy!
Winter Squash Soup with Gruyère Croutons
Adapted from: Bon Appétit December 1996
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/winter-squash-soup-with-gruyere-croutons-2997
The drier squashes will work well in this recipe; use the Delicata sparingly if you choose to include it, as it is very sweet.

Soup:

1/2 stick butter
1 large onion, finely chopped
4 large garlic cloves, chopped
Approximately 40 oz low-salt chicken or vegetable broth
8 cups 1-inch pieces (carefully!) peeled Winter squash (about 3 pounds total)
1 1/4 teaspoons minced fresh thyme
1 1/4 teaspoons minced fresh sage
1/4 cup whipping cream
1 teaspoon sugar (optional)

Croutons:

2 Tablespoons butter
24 baguette bread slices, 1/4-inch-thick
1 cup grated Gruyère cheese
1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme
1 teaspoon minced fresh sage

For soup:

Melt butter in large pot over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and sauté until tender, about 10 minutes. Add broth, all squash and herbs; bring to boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer until squash is very tender, about 20 minutes.

Working in batches, puree soup in blender. Return soup to same pot. Stir in cream and sugar; bring to simmer. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Chill. Rewarm over medium heat before serving.)

For croutons:

Preheat broiler. Butter 1 side of each bread slice. Arrange bread, buttered side up, on baking sheet. Broil until golden, about 1 minute. Turn over. Sprinkle cheese, then thyme and sage over. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Broil until cheese melts, about 1 minute. Ladle soup into bowls. Top each with croutons and serve.

 

Summer 2015 week 16

Summer 2015 – October, Week 16

What’s in the Box:

Green cabbage, Carnival squash, Delicata squash, corn, red potatoes, gold turnip, kohlrabi, purple carrots, red chard, broccoli

This week’s boxes are a bit heavy, reflecting the beginnings of the storage season.  Please lift with your legs when you pick up your share!  Next week’s boxes will be even heavier, so you might want to bring a cloth bag or two to help distribute the weight.
This week’s corn is the last of the season, and although it’s quite yummy, it didn’t get the heat that it should have to help it pollinate fully.  Please enjoy it in all its November local-corn glory anyway.  We’ve never had corn in November before, and may never again!

Just a reminder: the Winter share is available now-sign up soon to receive your prepayment discount!  http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/2016-january-through-march-only-C6854
I haven’t left much room to wax poetic about the weather or on-farm happenings, but I have yummy recipes to share, so perhaps that’s even better!

Enjoy!

Heidi

 

 

Moroccan-Style Stuffed Acorn Squash
Adapted from AllRecipes.com

2 Tablespoons brown sugar
1 Tablespoon butter, melted
1 large Carnival squash, halved and seeded
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped
2 carrots, chopped
1 cup garbanzo beans, drained
1/2 cup raisins
1 1/2 Tablespoons ground cumin
salt and pepper to taste
14 ounces low sodium chicken or vegetable broth
1 cup uncooked couscous

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Arrange squash halves cut side down on a baking sheet. Bake 45 minutes, or until tender. Dissolve the sugar in the melted butter. Brush squash with the butter mixture, and keep squash warm while preparing the stuffing.

Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Stir in the celery and carrots, and cook 5 minutes. Add garlic and sauté an additional minute, until fragrant.  Mix in the garbanzo beans and raisins. Season with cumin, salt, and pepper, and continue to cook and stir until vegetables are tender.

Pour broth into the skillet, and mix in the couscous. Cover skillet, and turn off heat. Allow couscous to absorb liquid for 10-15 minutes or until cooked.  Fluff with fork and stuff squash halves with the skillet mixture to serve.

Swiss Chard with Spicy Peanut Sauce

Adapted from: http://www.pennilessparenting.com/2014/02/swiss-chard-with-spicy-peanut-sauce.html

1 Tablespoon safflower oil
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
1 large onion
1 bunch Swiss chard
1/4 cup water (or as needed)
2 Tablespoons peanut butter
2 Tablespoons soy sauce
1 Tablespoon honey or sugar
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon ginger powder
Salt to taste
Sprinkle of red pepper flakes

Chop onion and sauté in oil until soft and translucent.
Chop up the stems of the Swiss chard and add them to the onion. Cook until they start to soften.
Chop up the leaves of the chard and add them to the pot. Cover, and cook, mixing occasionally, until wilted.
Add the rest of the ingredients, mix well, and cook a few more minutes.

Enjoy!

Kohlrabi and Carrot Slaw
Adapted from http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-kohlrabi-and-carrot-slaw-recipes-from-the-kitchn-46627

1 large kohlrabi, peeled, stems trimmed off, grated
1/4 head cabbage, shredded
2 medium carrots, scrubbed and grated
1/2 onion, grated
4 Tablespoons chopped cilantro
1/4 cup golden raisins (optional)
1/4 cup mayonnaise
1 Tablespoon cider vinegar
1 Tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt

Combine the kohlrabi, cabbage, carrots, onion, cilantro, and raisins (if using) in a large bowl. In a smaller bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, cider vinegar, sugar, and salt. Pour the dressing over the slaw, and mix until fully coated. Chill for several hours before serving.

Winter 2015 - February week 2

Winter 2015 – February, Week 2

What’s in the Box:

Yellow potatoes*, Pinova or Salish Rose apples, Purple Carrots*,
Parsnips*, Sunchokes, Leeks*, Kale*, Thyme*,
Crimini Mushrooms, Honey!*

 

 

Dear Members,

All items with an * are from Boistfort Valley Farm.  Additional items are certified organic.

It has been lovely (but cold!) this week.  The sun inspires me to get my hands into the dirt (or the soil mix) to peruse the local nursery for bare root trees and fun seeds, and to begin whatever sort of seeding I can get away with.  The frosty mornings are quick to remind me, however, that seeds have quite a while before they’ll make it outside on their own.  That doesn’t stop us from filling a few trays with soil and planting Natty’s choice of flowers, though.  They are slowly sprouting in the greenhouse, a tiny miracle to observe each day.

This time of Winter for me (and maybe for you, too!) can be a little tough to bear.  I long for warm and sun at the same time.  I begin to chant little mantras under my breath (rain, rain, go away or warm UP, warm UP are common this year) and I’m really beginning to miss the Spring greens.  The good news is that the days are getting noticeably longer, the bulbs and those hardy primroses that Winter didn’t damage have begun to bloom, and we have Hope once again for the warm season.  And so I turn my thoughts around from what I don’t have to what I do: even though I’m out of onions, I can only be mopey for so long, because there’s a field of leeks out my window!  This week I’m making room in my days for a celebration of what I DO have, even if it’s just for a moment: sunshine out my window, variety from the fields…  I can wait a little bit longer for Spring greens.

A few notes on this delivery: The Salish Rose apples, part of this week’s apple combo, have kaolin clay on them, and should be washed before eating.  Kaolin clay is an accepted material for organic apples, and is used as a physical barrier to keep pests from damaging fruit.  More information at: http://www.planetnatural.com/wp-content/uploads/kaolin-clay.pdf

We have sunchokes (also known as Jerusalem Artichokes) from Wobbly Cart Farm in today’s boxes.  These odd little guys are related to sunflowers, and they resemble ginger in appearance (although not in flavor).  Check out an easy roasting recipe here: http://www.thekitchn.com/try-this-roasted-sunchokes-105348 (I included the link because I do love a food blog, and they had some yummy sounding stuff on there!)  I have also included a recipe below.

The honey is from hives that the Woogie Bee folks, Tim and Sharette Geise, bring to our farm every Spring.  They help to pollinate our vegetable fields and the surrounding flowers, and provide us with enough honey to share with you.  Today’s jar is from the 2014 season.

Enjoy!

Heidi

Summer 2014 – Week 7

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Lettuce, Radicchio, Purple Carrots, English Shell Peas,
Apricots, Basil & 4 Stems of Flowers.
Small shares:
Lettuce, Radicchio, Purple Carrots, Fennel,
English Shell Peas, Green Onions,
Apricots & 4 Stems of Flowers.
Family shares:
Lettuce, Purple Carrots, Fennel, Summer  Squash,
English Shell Peas, Green Onions,
Apricots & 4 Stems of Flowers.

 

Please remember to take: 4 Stems of Flowers

Dear Friends,

It looks like the warm weather is back after last week’s reprieve of clouds and so much rain.  These long, sultry days of sunshine make for thriving plants and luscious produce.  Some of the radicchio grown here at the farm is the largest I have ever seen.

In your boxes this week you will find peas!!  Tender and sweet, fresh English Shell Peas add sparkle to any meal, if they actually make it INTO the meal; ours usually get eaten by the handful long before, on par with any berry! They do need to be shelled mind you; which is as easy as running your thumb nail along the length of the union of the two halves of the shell on the inside edge of the pod. The pod will open like a book revealing the peas within.

We also have apricots to offer this week, which are a real treat.  Apricots are at their peak right now and these are the Rival variety and grown right here in Washington state.  Apricots are just one more of the highlights of midsummer.

Speaking of fruit, if you and your family crave more than we deliver in our regular Summer share boxes, Our Fruit Shares have been well received and there are some still available.  These come on a weekly basis and consists of a variety of seasonal fruits.  Even though we began offering the Fruit share a couple of weeks ago, when you sign up your payment is pro-rated, just like the regular Summer Share.

As always, thank you for being our partners in this farming experience and accompanying us on this season’s journey of planting, growing, harvesting, sharing and eating.  Have a wonderful week!

Emily

A couple of notes on the included flowers:

When taking your Glads, please be gentle with the ones you are leaving for other members.  They are easily damaged.

Winter 2014 – February, week 2

What’s in the Box:

Carrots, Purple Carrots,
Parsnips, Leeks, Fuji apples, D’Anjou pears,
Shiitake mushrooms, Red cipollini onions,
Shallots, Red potatoes & OlyKraut sauerkraut

Dear Members,

I’d like to introduce myself as the newest member of the BVF team.  My name is Kathryn and I am the new Production Manager here.  Over the years, I have bounced back and forth between Vermont, Montana, and the Northwest.  My background is in organic vegetable and seed farming and I spent the past few years working in my home state of Vermont for an organic seed company. I’m happy to have returned to the Northwest and am busy integrating into this great place.  Rachel, Mike, and Bj have all been getting me up to speed, and I look forward to making connections with you all as well!

I’ve just returned to the office after a lovely few hours of seeding in the greenhouse.  The clouds broke every so often that it warmed up to a nice, humid 75 degrees, I’d guess.  The onions are looking tall, soft and a beautiful vibrant green while the celery, lettuces and artichokes are just beginning to show their first true leaves.  Today I seeded some of our first plantings of those cool-loving brassicas: broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and cabbage.  These crops all have lovely, hard, round seeds that never cease to enamor me with their subtle, varying shades of purples and reds.  I love spending the time in the greenhouse to get to really examine those tiny living spheres that will turn into our shared bounty in a few short months.

The same variety of cabbage that I seeded today is also featured in your box in the form of sauerkraut from OlyKraut.  Cabbages that are best used for sauerkraut are very dense with thin leaves and a blanched interior and this variety can grow up to 12 lbs.  We grow this cabbage exclusively for OlyKraut so we are happy to, in the depths of winter, be able to include it in your CSA box. Enjoy!

Kathryn

Winter 2014 – February, week 1

What’s in the Box:

Carrots*, Purple carrots*,
Garlic*, Parsnips*, Leeks*,
Dried lavender*, Woogie Bee Honey,
Braeburn apples, Concorde pears,
Cremini mushrooms, Yellow onions
& Russet potatoes.
*From our farm

 

Dear Members,

Whenever anyone has a complaint about the weather here in western Washington I am quick to say that I can’t help but like it – I live here on purpose. The trick, of course, is to live here with purpose.  Farmers like Mike and Heidi are full of purpose.  Watching plans take shape for all that will be produced and delivered in the coming year (and beyond) is an amazing coming together of dreams and realities intricately fitted together – not unlike Mike’s annual jigsaw puzzle. The framing pieces are your plans for a delicious, healthy and purposeful life. You are the anchor piece in our plans and we are so proud to be part of yours.

Even though we are still working in a little snow here in the Boistfort Valley and have lots of yummy fare still coming in our Winter Shares, the 2014 Summer Season is taking shape!  As in years past, we are offering Early Bird pricing for Summer Shares paid for in full before May 1st.  It is one way for us to say thank you for supporting your local organic farmer and participating in the stewardship of western Washington farmland.

Please visit the website at http://www.boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/store and place your order, either paying in full or using the handy installment plan.  We deliver to a few less sites in winter so if the website doesn’t offer your favorite spot just remember that we will solidify our delivery calendar in June and we can update your delivery location then.

Rachel has come up with some first-rate recipes for this week’s offerings so I had best leave her a little room.  I find a lot of promise in a grey February day, as if some purpose is assured!  Let me know how we can help with your plans for the coming season.  I look forward to hearing from you.

– Bj

Winter 2014 – January, week 2

What’s in the Box:

Bulk beets*, Bulk carrots*,
Bulk purple carrots*, Leeks*,
Parsnips*, Yellow cipollini onions,
Purple fingerling potatoes,
d’Anjou pears, Gala apples
& St. Lucia Coffee
*From our farm

 

 

Dear Members,

Here’s hoping you have held on to some of that garlic, maybe even hung a bunch of our thyme in the kitchen where you can get it down for this week’s recipes. I love to cook, and I know I have said it before, but that is why I got into farming in the first place. Okay, right, first and foremost I love to eat therefore I have learned to love to cook. Nothing makes a great cook out of a fair one like the use of fresh local ingredients. I am thinking about cooking as I write because over the past few years there are two words which, for me, have become joined at the hip; baked and fruit. I probably did not bake an apple or pear until I was in my forties. My advice? Don’t wait that long, or if you have, don’t delay in trying it. I have included a very simple recipe for baked pears, but encourage anyone with a sense of adventure to try this: http://www.prouditaliancook.com/2013/10/ricotta-filled-baked-pears.html

We are still busy here at the farm. We are down to a skeleton crew with only two men in the field, and Rachel is often alone in the pack shed. We do try to cross train everyone and the field crew is generous with their time in helping Rachel when she needs it. Darren Johnson has taken the hot seat as our delivery driver, and has settled in well. I have traveled with Darren in an old mini-van full of children ranging in age from 14-5, he is a calm and capable driver and we are pleased to have his help. Say hi if you get a chance. Heidi and I have been working on the seed order and planning for next season. Then there are all the other year end responsibilities; taxes, compliance issues, and the like keeping Bj and me busy in the office; never a dull moment.

I so hope you are enjoying your deliveries. If so please talk us up and know that it is never too late to join for the remainder of the winter deliveries, nor too early to subscribe to our summer 2014 season. Our advertising will go out in early February. Current members will be able to join through the website by February 1.

Mike

 

A note about the Santa Lucia Coffee Roasters’ coffee included in your CSA box. St. Lucia is a local coffee roaster in Centralia, Washington, and we hope you love their coffee as much as we do. www.luciacoffee.com

Elegantly smooth and sweet, Finca Vista Hermosa embodies the essence of Guatemalan coffee. Exquisitely balanced you’ll find juicy orange citrus, bakers chocolate and hints of passion fruit in every cup. Family owned and operated the Martinez Family firmly believes: “if you can’t do it well, don’t do it at all.”  A 2007 Cup of Excellence winner, this exclusive testament to Guatemalan coffee is one worth experiencing.

Winter 2014 – January, week 1

What’s in the Box:

Bulk chioggia and red beets*,
Bulk carrots*, Bulk purple carrots*,
Garlic*, Rutabaga*, Acorn Squash*,
Leeks*, Parsnips*, Yellow onions,
Austrian Crescent potatoes,
Bosc pears, Braeburn apples,
& Black Sheep Creamery cheese
*From our farm

 

Please take 1 cheese.

Dear Members,

I have to admit, when I opened the notes to begin writing I was delighted to find that there was so little room left once the recipes were included. Some days I just have more to say than others. I do hope you all enjoyed the holidays and that your transition back to the grind or the life or just getting the kids back to school and into the routine again has gone smoothly. The house still smells mildly of frankincense and myrrh, and I am happy to report that my annual jigsaw puzzle (this year a 1500 piece Springbok) is on schedule for completion. I set out a puzzle every year on the dining room table and endeavor to complete it before starting the seed order on the same table. The puzzle comes out after the plates are cleared from Christmas dinner, and must be finished in enough time to complete the seed order by January 15th. I am going to be pushing it but I’m confident. I love the annual jigsaw; a concrete and hopeful metaphor. I start by turning all the pieces over, then attempt to identify all the edges, then construct the outline, then separate by color and texture, then begin to fit the puzzle together, one piece at a time, sometimes quickly sometimes slowly, until the image begins to take shape, eventually matching the perfect picture as it appears on the box top. More things in life should be like this.

Enjoy this deliveries add-on; Black Sheep Creamery’s Tin Willow Tomme. Tomme is a type of cheese produced mainly in the French Alps, and is traditionally a bit lower in fat than other more ‘full’ cheeses. Brad at Black Sheep identifies it as a bit milder by comparison, and an excellent cheese to pair with fruit and a red wine for an appetizer. Check out Black Sheep Creamery on the web at www.blacksheepcreamery.com .

Mike