Winter 2016 - Week 3

Winter 2016 – Week 3

What’s in the Box:

*Austrian Crescent potatoes
*Carrots-purple
*Red Russian Kale
*Leeks
*Red Cabbage
*Beets
*Parsley
*Dry Beans
Yellow & Red Cipollini Onions (WA)
Ruby Crescent Potatoes (OR)
Enterprise Apples (WA)
Red D’Anjou Pears (WA)
Shiitake Mushrooms (OR)

*grown on our farm

Dear Members,

I know that you all must get tired of me talking about the weather, but let me just say this: WOOOOOOOWWWWW!!

Natty insisted on going out in shorts and a t-shirt yesterday, and then going to the river, which lasted until her feet got cold (about 5 minutes).  Even still, we’re grateful for the Vitamin D. I hope you’re getting a little sunshine on this lovely day.

We have included my favorite dry beans today-a cranberry type bean that is the creamiest most delicious bean ever.  I have included a simple recipe below, but feel free to substitute them in any recipe that calls for dried beans.  My only advice is not to overcook them if you prefer a firm bean-they will become soft and break down if overcooked.
I’ve marked all items from our farm with an asterisk (*).  The other produce is certified organic, Washington or Oregon grown as indicated in the list on the left.

As always, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

Yours,
Heidi

Pack and Go Lunch: Tangled Red Cabbage Salad
Adapted from:  http://www.theclevercarrot.com/2016/01/pack-and-go-lunch-tangled-red-cabbage-salad/
Author: Emilie Raffa (recipe adapted from Heike on Instagram)

For the Dressing
1 tbsp all-natural creamy peanut butter
1 tbsp rice wine vinegar or white vinegar
1 tsp soy sauce
the juice of ½ lime
1 tsp honey, plus more to taste
2 tbsp coconut milk
1 tbsp hot water
dash of hot sauce

For the Salad
1 small red cabbage, sliced paper thin
2 cups shredded kale
2 scallions, white & light green part only, thinly sliced
1-2 clementines, peeled and sliced into wheels
¼ cups pomegranate seeds
1 serving cooked black rice soba noodles (optional)
1 tsp white sesame seeds (optional)

Add all of the dressing ingredients to a small bowl. Whisk until well blended.

To prepare the salad, add the cabbage, kale and scallions to a large bowl. Pour a little bit of the dressing over the top and toss well. Marinate for 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, if using soba noodles, cook them according to the package directions. When finished, rinse under cold water. Drain well and add to the salad.

To finish, add the clementine wheels, pomegranate seeds and sesame seeds (if using). Add additional dressing and toss well to combine. Taste, and add more lime juice as needed.

Serve at room temperature.
Shiitake Angel Hair Pasta
Adapted from: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/11706/shiitake-angel-hair-pasta/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=4 Recipe By:Ann

6 ounces angel hair pasta
6 ounces fresh sliced shiitake mushrooms
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 small onion, chopped
1/4 cup white wine
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 Tablespoon butter
1/4 cup chicken or vegetable broth, preferably low sodium
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
salt to taste
ground black pepper to taste
2 Tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Sauté onion in olive oil and butter over medium heat until soft and translucent.  Add garlic and sauté until just fragrant, then add mushrooms and brown lightly. Add chicken stock and wine, and cook until mixture is reduced to 1/2 volume. Blend in cream, and reduce to desired thickness. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water until al dente.  Drain pasta, and toss with sauce until coated. Serve on small warmed plates, topped with grated Parmesan cheese and parsley.

Simple Beans
To be used as a side with cotija cheese, or served with chips, on tortillas with cheese and toppings, or as desired. If cooking for soup, just cut the cumin and cilantro.

1 1/2 cups dry beans
1 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp coriander
1/2 tsp garlic powder (fresh, high quality — otherwise use more)
1 heaping tsp dried cilantro leaves
1/2 tsp salt

Sort dry beans. Rinse thoroughly and pour into a medium pot. Add water to at least two inches above the level of the beans. Soak overnight OR bring to a boil for approximately 5 minutes, then remove from heat. Let stand one hour.
Once beans have been soaked, or boiled and soaked, pour out water and refill with new, again two inches over the level of the beans. Bring to a boil and add seasonings, but not salt. Simmer until liquid is reduced and beans are soft and creamy, one hour or longer. Add salt and additional seasonings as desired.

 

2015summer_week7

Summer 2015 – September, Week 7

What’s in the Box:

Roma beans, Red Cabbage, Sweet onion
Garlic, Green Kohlrabi
Zucchini & Summer squash
Cucumbers, Gold Chard
Arugula, Mizuna, Basil, Peaches
Flowers

Dear Members,

Please take one bouquet of flowers

As I sit down to write to you all this morning, I can’t see a thing outside the window.  It stays dark a bit later each morning, and makes it a little more difficult to roll out of bed and greet the day… or the almost day, as it were.  The rain seems to have slowed us down and delivered Autumn all at once, making for an unusually quick shift in our mental state.

If you haven’t noticed yet, we farmers loooove to talk about the weather. It’s not just that we’re boring, or that we don’t seem to have any hobbies because all we manage to do is farm mostly (although I’m not saying either of those things is necessarily untrue).  Honestly, weather dictates so much of our business that we just can’t get around talking about it.

I’ll spare you my diatribe on Spring, and how rain can slow us down, or drought, and what that means for us, and focus on rain right now.

Rain means certain veggies are happy, and others mold.  It means we shift the harvest to get the most sensitive things in before they get wet (or we harvest them later to deliver them extra fresh), we take longer to harvest, wash, and pack the veggies, we contend with a different set of circumstances.

Autumn means that we often work on the edges of day, and sometimes in darkness.  We have to be more careful about plans for each day, and we try to spread out tasks so that we aren’t working until 8pm. By necessity, we start later.  You can’t see much in the field in total or even semi-darkness.

All this to say that weather means a lot around here.

And that your veggies soaked up all that beautiful rain, and might not last quite as long as they did when they didn’t get rained on.  Specifically, please forgive us if the Roma beans don’t hold up as well as they should.

Now, for those of you who made it through all that, (or maybe you just skipped it) come see us at the Tilth Harvest Fair this weekend!  The fair is this Saturday from 10am to 4pm at Meridian Park in Seattle (behind the Good Shepherd Center, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N. Seattle, WA 98103).  Find more information about the fair and what’s on the schedule here:http://www.seattletilth.org/special_events/harvestfair2015

Yours,

Heidi

summer8

Summer 2014 – Week 8

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Beans, Beets, Red Potatoes,
Red Cabbage, Savory & 2 Stems Lilies.
Small shares:
Beans, Beets, Red Potatoes,
Red Cabbage, Savory, Dill & 2 Stems Lilies.
Family shares:
Red Leaf Lettuce, Beans, Beets,
Red Potatoes, Red Cabbage, Savory,
Dill & 2 Stems Lilies.

 

Please remember to take: 2 Stem Lilies

Dear Friends,

Here we are, the first week of August already! These long, warm days bring an abundance of ripening vegetables, and our boxes are reflecting this with new varieties.

We are digging our first potatoes this week; Red Norlands. New potatoes are freshly harvested young potatoes; uncured and so sweet. They have paper-thin skins with lots of moisture inside.  Because they have such thin skins and high moisture levels, new potatoes don’t keep quite as well as more mature, cured, potatoes. Keep them in a paper bag or loosely wrapped plastic in the fridge and use them within a few days.  Don’t yield to the temptation to wash new potatoes before storing them. That bit of dirt clinging to their skins will actually help keep them fresh and any water on the outside will hasten bruising and softening.

We have also started harvesting our first crop of beets for the year, our varieties include: red, gold and the Italian heirloom: Chioggia. The bean harvest is also in full swing; these snap beans are tender enough to be eaten raw, right off the bush (or out of the CSA box).

This week, we have included both Dill and Savory.  Savory, also known as ‘Summer Savory’ is a traditional Mediterranean herb, used to season legumes, fish, eggs and vegetable dishes.  Both these herbs complement one another, and most of the vegetables in your boxes this week, as shown in the recipes below; just one more way we work to accommodate you, our CSA members in your kitchen ease and eating pleasure.

We hope you are enjoying your vegetables, herbs and flowers.  Thank you for your part in our farm—we so appreciate our lovely CSA members.  Have a great week!

Please also continue to talk us up to your friends and coworkers! Word of mouth is far and away our best advertising, and we still have plenty of room in the program for new members. Anyone interested in a Boistfort Valley Farm subscription can still sign up, their order is always pro-rated at the time they do.

Emily

A couple of notes on the included flowers:  When taking your lilies, please be gentle with the ones you are leaving for other members.  They are easily damaged from excessive handling.  Also, the falling pollen can stain a delicate tablecloth; when displaying your lilies, either put something underneath or pluck the little anthers out.  Thank you!

Winter 2014 – March, week 1

What’s in the Box:

Carrots*, Parsnips*, Leeks*, Red Cabbage, Curly Kale, Crimini Mushrooms, Red Delicious Apples,
Sunchokes, Mixed Fingerlings, Yellow Onions, Daffodils, Black Sheep Creamery Cheese.
*From our farm

 
PLEASE TAKE 1 CHEESE & 1 DAFFODIL BUNCH!

Dear Members,

It is a foggy morning here at the farm.  With these longer days, the “spring forward” of Daylight Saving Time, and the realization that everything seemed to get greener last week, I’m pleased to remind you that spring will be here around the time you receive your next box!  Although we are still in winter right now, it is quite exciting to be able to provide our first splash of colorful flowers to your share this week with these cheerful yellow daffodils.

In light of the tough early winter weather which really impacted our greens, in particular, this week we have opted to extend outside of our normal Washington and Oregon region to bring you some red
cabbage and kale from California.  We have thought long and hard about reaching that far out of our region to supplement our CSA and we hope that you enjoy this bit of green.  We look forward to incorporating more locally available greens in upcoming boxes.

A few notes on what is included in this box: We have also included Sunchokes in this box.  The recipe I have added below is one that looks delicious and I, myself, am looking forward to trying!  The cheese included from Black Sheep Creamery is “a fresh, sheep-milk ‘cream’ cheese.”  Tart and tangy, it will keep in the fridge for 2 weeks.  Brad told me that on Friday, it was grass waiting to be eaten, by Saturday it was milk waiting to be given by the sheep, and by Sunday it was being made into cheese. Enjoy!

Kathryn