Summer 2014 – Week 1

What’s in the Box:

Lettuce, Arugula, Purple Mizuna OR Garlic scapes, Baby Bok Choy,
Red Radish, AND STRAWBERRIES!

Small shares also include:
Tatsoi & more strawberries!!

Family shares also include:
Tatsoi, Amethyst Radish & even more Strawberries!!!

 

 

Please remember to take:
Family share: three pints of strawberries
Small share: two pints of strawberries
Petite share: one pint of strawberries

A few notes about pick up:

Please be sure to find your name on the sign-in sheet, double check which share size you signed up for, and take the correct share size. If you take the wrong size it means someone else will also end up with the wrong size.

Double check the sign-in sheet for other items that you should take. Delicate items like flowers and berries never go into the boxes — we put them alongside so that they aren’t damaged. Your sign-in sheet will tell you how many to take.

Please return any clean, reusable CSA boxes to us next week when you pick up your share. If your box is ripped, or the cat decides to make it his new home, please recycle it instead.

Remember that our site hosts graciously open their homes for us to make these deliveries. As you can imagine, it’s easy to be overwhelmed by a giant stack of boxes toppling over when you open your front door. Please feel free to (carefully) break down your boxes and flatten them to make storing them easier. Also, please honor the pick-up times listed. If you find that you cannot pick up your vegetables during the times listed, please contact us.

If you have any questions, call or email us!

About today’s boxes:

Our strawberries are called Shuksan: a classic berry with wonderful flavor, you can expect them to hold up for less than 24 hours. They aren’t the super berries that you see in the grocery store — these little berries will break your heart if you don’t eat them right away. But their taste is unlike anything you will find on the grocery store shelf — unless you shop at your local co-op.

This has been a challenging spring to manage the CSA. We got onto the fields earlier than usual and seeded a first planting of everything in April; beets, carrots, greens. Then we were hit with driving rains that pelted the freshly planted beds. These plantings either crusted over to a point that none but the hardiest sprouts could penetrate, or were simply washed out. In some cases our beds sat underwater for days. As a result we tilled in almost two acres of abysmal plantings and reseeded as early as possible. I was tempted to document this phenomenon but opted to just put it behind me. In the mean time our strawberries ripened a full two weeks ahead of their regularly scheduled harvest date. Ughh.

One of my steadfast rules is ‘never qualify’, but this spring I must make an exception. We have thought and met and thought and projected and talked and met and talked some more here at the farm, and though we have always started the program and ran straight through the season without interruption we have concluded that the option of suspending deliveries for one week will allow us to best serve our customers. This is not a cancellation or exclusion; we will simply deliver this first box, which will allow us to get you a taste of our locally famous Shuksan berries along with a selection of spring greens. Then, rather than inundate you with a second delivery of the same greens, we will take a one week hiatus. One week later, the week of June 22nd, when we provide a second delivery, our selection of greens will have expanded and we can include fresh garlic and other selections with our beets, carrots, and peas to follow.

We will remind everyone via email of the specifics of this untraditional delivery schedule and I invite you to call or email if you have any questions. I want to thank you for your kind understanding of the nature of farming, and apologize in advance for any confusion this might create. Please know that we value our customers and take seriously our obligation to provide the quality and quantity you deserve. Rest assured we are not diminishing the value of your CSA experience but rather responding to a crazy spring and prioritizing the experience that is eating a fresh local berry.

Winter 2014 – April, week 2

What’s in the Box:

Bulk carrots*, Leeks*, Curly Kale*,
Rhubarb, Red radish, Yukon potatoes,
Rainbow Chard, Oyster mushrooms,
Red dandelion, Cameo apples
& Tayberry Jam
*From our farm

 

Dear Members,

Today is Earth Day.  We are enjoying a combination of both sun and rain here in the valley, typical of our Pacific Northwest spring.  This is a season of change; we are reminded of this as the sharp breezes and cold showers are warmed by bright sun breaks.  It is in this transition of winter-to-spring that seedlings thrive, reveling in the steaminess of the newly-turned ground and satisfying our long-standing anticipation of the days to come.

At this time of year in the kitchen, we are in transition as well.  We are just beginning to enjoy the fruits of new-things-growing, while still holding ourselves over with our winter fare.  In this week’s box, the sturdy, cold-hardy standbys of leeks, kale, carrots and potatoes are spiced up by glimpses of the freshness of spring—dandelion greens, rhubarb and oyster mushrooms.  This week especially, greens are exploding in our area, and in our boxes, adding a lushness to the mix.  In MY kitchen, I have been adding shredded kale to everything — from salads, to curries, to pizza.  As this is quickly becoming redundant, I am looking forward to trying Rachel’s recipes this week.

In this week’s notes, I would also like to introduce myself.  My name is Emily and I have recently joined the Boistfort Valley Farm team as our Sales and Outreach representative.  I grew up in the valley, next door to the land which is now the farm.  I find it a bit nostalgic to think that the fields I ran and played in as a kid now hold the vegetables that nourish my family as well as yours.

Emily