Winter 2016 CSA - week 4

Winter 2016 – Week 4

What’s in the box?

*Fingerling potatoes, *Orange Carrots, *Purple Carrots, *Swiss Chard, *Red Russian Kale, *Leeks, *Savoy Cabbage, *Baking Potatoes, Yellow Onions, Sunchokes, Parsnips, Cameo Apples, D’Anjou Pears, Baby Boc Choy, Black Sheep Creamery Cheese
*grown on our farm

 

PLEASE TAKE ONE PACKAGE OF CHEESE.
Cheese is packed separately from your veggies to keep it cold.

We are delighted to have a variety of vegetables from our farm once again this week, plus a smattering of other Northwest goodies.  One of the more unusual selections today is the bag of Jerusalem Artichokes, also known as sunchokes.  Sunchokes, or Helianthus tuberosus, are related to sunflowers, and sport a mildly artichoke-like flavor that helps give them their name.  They are known both to be delicious raw AND to cause stomach rumbling/gas when consumed raw, so I leave it to you to determine how you will eat them.  I have included a recipe for cooked sunchokes below.

I’ve marked all items from our farm with an asterisk (*).  The other produce is certified organic and grown as indicated in the list on the left.  We do have one California item this delivery, to my dismay.  I try to keep the boxes as local as possible, but we just don’t have the temperatures to launch the  next season of veggies the way we’d like to, and it’s a fine dance between giving you a variety of greens and roots, and keeping it close to home.  Thanks for your understanding, and if you’re okay with more beets, rutabaga & potatoes, don’t hesitate to let us know!

As always, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

Yours,
Heidi

 

 

Sunchoke and Potato Gratin
Adapted from First Look, Then Cook: http://firstlookthencook.com/2010/02/07/sunchoke-and-potato-gratin/

2 shallots, sliced thin
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp olive oil, plus more to grease pan
1 Tbsp butter
10 sunchokes (about golf-ball sized), peeled, sliced thin
2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and sliced thin
1/4 cup milk
1 cup Black Sheep Creamery cheese
Pinch of nutmeg
Salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Add 1 tsp olive oil and 1 Tbsp butter to skillet.  Add shallot and sauté over medium heat, careful not to brown heavily.  When shallot is translucent, add garlic cloves; cook until just fragrant.  Remove from heat.

Grease a 9×9 ceramic dish lightly with olive oil. Layer the potatoes evenly in the dish covering the entire bottom.  Sprinkle with nutmeg, salt and pepper.  Layer the sunchokes evenly covering the potatoes.  Sprinkle the shallot/garlic mixture on top of the sunchokes – and sprinkle again with salt and pepper.  Pour milk all over the vegetables.  Sprinkle with the cheese.

Cover the dish with tin foil and bake for about 45 minutes.  Take the cover off and bake for an additional 15 minutes.  Make sure the sunchokes are soft – if not cook a little longer.

Ginger/Garlic Savoy Cabbage
from: http://www.food.com/recipe/ginger-garlic-savoy-cabbage-15832

1 head savoy cabbage (about 1 1/2 lbs), cored, shredded across in approx 3/4-inch slices
2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 Tablespoon minced garlic
Salt & pepper
1 1/4 Tablespoons ginger, minced
Juice of 1 lime
Heat wok or large skillet medium high heat, wait until oil is hot.  Add cabbage and stir fry until cabbage just starts to wilt (do nor overcook).  Add garlic, salt and pepper cook 1 minute.  Add ginger cook 1 minute.  Drizzle with lime juice and serve.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/220583/glazed-carrots-and-parsnips-with-chives/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=8

Simple Parsnip Pancakes
Adapted from recipe by Catherine Boynton: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/239758/simple-parsnip-pancakes/?internalSource=recipe%20hub&referringId=2449&referringContentType=recipe%20hub

1 cup grated scrubbed parsnips
2 eggs
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1 Tablespoon olive oil
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
Ground black pepper to taste (optional)
2 teaspoons sunflower oil, or more as needed
Combine parsnips, eggs, onion, olive oil, salt, rosemary, and black pepper together in a bowl until batter is combined and lumpy.
Heat sunflower oil in a heavy frying pan over medium heat. Spoon batter into oil and fry until pancakes are brown and crispy on the edges, 6 to 7 minutes per side.

Winter 2016 CSA - week 1

Winter 2016 – Week 1

What’s in the Box:

*Savoy Cabbage, *Kale-Curly , *Parsley-Curly , *Carnival squash,
*Baking potatoes, *Austrian Crescent potatoes, *Golden Beets,
*Leeks, *Carrots-Purple & Orange, Braeburn Apples, D’Anjou Pears
Santa Lucia Coffee

*grown on our farm

Happy New Year!  We have a variety of lovely produce for the deliveries this week.  All items with an asterisk (*) are from our farm.  The other produce is certified organic, Washington grown (this is, the apples and pears).

As a reminder, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website orcontact us at the farm.

The cold temperatures and the snow have kept us out of the field for the last little bit, but they didn’t do much damage to the Winter veggies.  The snow especially delighted Natty, who was out there throwing snowballs morning and night, much to the displeasure of our Labrador, Dinah.  Snowballs, unlike tennis balls, explode on impact, and Dinah learned this the first time she caught one in her mouth.  She spent the rest of the day lurking on the porch, staring out the window, presumably waiting for the snow to melt.
Well, melt it did, but it’s been quite icy in the mornings, and we step carefully around the farm to keep from slipping and sliding, especially with loads of produce.  We are looking forward to the warmer rainy weather we were promised by the folks who study these things. Please be careful out there when picking up your boxes!

We have a special treat in the boxes today: a locally roasted coffee provided by our favorite roasters and friends at Santa Lucia Coffee Roasters, Justin and Lucy Page.  Here’s a little something that Justin sent me about the coffee included with your produce:

The San Rafael Urias farm rests on the side of a small mountain in the valley of San Miguel Duenas, Antigua. It is shadowed by the Agua (Water) and Fuego (Fire) volcanoes. Founded by Rafael Valdes Quiroa in the late 1880s, it is now owned and managed by the third generation of the family, headed by Don Isidro Valdes.  Workers on the farm are allowed to grow their own crops in these areas. There is also some land reserved as forest, providing a sanctuary for migrant birds.

San Rafael is also benefited by small natural springs, which give clean drinking water and irrigation for the seedlings in the nursery. They have now piped this spring over 1.5km to their mill and use it for the washing and pulping of the cherries (the raw coffee beans). The farm is also next to the Guacalote River, which is used to provide hydraulic energy to the coffee mill.

This is a genuine Antigua coffee as certified by the APCA, the genuine Antigua Coffee Growers Association. The APCA was created by local producers in 2000 to protect the ‘Antigua’ reputation. Unfortunately, many lesser quality Guatemalan coffees were sold under this prestigious name and it became damaging for the true local producers. The APCA have gone on to help other growers in the area with training and support to further their craft. Enjoy!
Yours,
Heidi

 

 

 

Cabbage Fried Rice
Adapted from: http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/cabbage-fried-rice

2 Tablespoons vegetable oil

1 leek, halved or quartered lengthwise, cut into 1/4-inch slices

1 cup thinly sliced or julienned carrots

4 cups shredded Savoy cabbage

2 garlic cloves, minced

2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger

1 1/2 cups long-grain white rice

4 large eggs, beaten

2 Tablespoons soy sauce

Juice of 1 lime
2 scallions, thinly sliced
Cook rice in a pot of boiling salted water until al dente.  Drain immediately.
In a nonstick wok or large skillet, heat the oil. Add the leek, carrots and cabbage and stir-fry over high heat until the vegetables are softened and beginning to brown, about 7 minutes. Add the garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the rice and stir-fry until heated through and beginning to brown, about 3 minutes.

Push the fried rice to the side of the pan to create a well. Pour the eggs into the well and cook, stirring gently, until nearly cooked. Toss the fried rice with the eggs and cook for 1 minute longer. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the soy sauce, lime juice and scallions. Transfer the fried rice to bowls and serve.

Warm Golden Beet Salad with Greens and Almonds
Adapted from: http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-warm-golden-beet-salad-116139

1 ½ lbs golden beets (you received 2 lbs total in your share)
½ bunch of kale
Olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 cloves garlic, minced
4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
2/3 cup toasted almond slivers
Heat the oven to 425°F. Line a 9-inch square baking pan or cake tin with a big square of foil, large enough to complete enclose the beet roots. Lightly rinse the beet roots to remove any really clumpy dirt and pat them dry. Place them in the foil square and lightly drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle generously with salt and pepper. Fold up the foil and crease to seal. Bake the beets for 60 minutes or until they can be just pierced with a fork. Set aside to cool.
Meanwhile, strip the kale leaves from the stems, and chop leaves into bite-size ribbons. Rinse thoroughly. Discard stems. In a large skillet, heat a drizzle of olive oil over medium heat; add garlic. Cook on low for about 2 minutes or until garlic is golden and fragrant. Add kale leaves and stir to coat. Cook on medium-low for about 10 minutes or until leaves are soft and tender. Add a bit of water if needed to keep the kale from drying out/scorching. Remove from heat.
When the beets are cool, remove skins (they should slip off easily). Chop beets into bite-sized pieces and toss with the cooked greens, goat cheese, and almonds. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve warm or cold.

2015_summerweek13

Summer 2015 – October, Week 13

At a Glance:

Chioggia Beets, Carrots, Sweet Onions, Savoy Cabbage, Cucumbers,
Italian Zucchini, Green Beans, Yellow Beans, Bell Pepper,
Dandelion, Yellow Chard

 

 

Dear Friends,
There is a saying among firefighters:

Firefighting is easy; it’s like riding a bike, except that the bike is on fire, and you’re on fire, and everything is on fire, and…well, you get the picture.

I feel that way about farming sometimes, it’s easy, like riding a bike, except that the bike is on fire, and you’re on fire, and everything is on fire.  Then, it’s October.

October for me is all about cleaning up. I would like to simply say it’s easy, like cleaning your kitchen, except your kitchen is 70 acres and you need trucks and loaders and your help is already working full time and then some and if you’re lucky you’ll get everything in before the mud makes the fields impassible. But then all the pipe and pumps are in the barn, and the fields are covered with rye and vetch and clover.

This year, barring early rain, I have just enough time to get all the open areas cover-cropped before it gets too cold for a solid stand of rye. A well orchestrated Fall plan is a work of art in early spring. Lush green fields passively creating tons of material to add tilth to next year’s soil, feed next year’s crops, retain nutrients, prevent erosion, and feed pollinators.

Wish me luck!

Mike

We harvested an abundance of Italian zucchini this week (truly surprising this time of year!), so I have included my favorite zucchini bread recipe.  Give it a try and freeze what you don’t eat!

 

Zucchini Bread

Julie Sochacki, One United Harvest
Makes two large loaves
3 eggs

1-3/4 cups sugar

1 cup light vegetable oil

2-1/2 cups peeled, grated zucchini

2-1/2 tsp. vanilla extract

3 cups flour

1 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

3 tsp cinnamon
1/8 c walnut or hazelnut oil
Beat the eggs, then add sugar, mixing well. Add the oil, zucchini and vanilla, mix well. Sift the dry ingredients and slowly add to sugar mixture. Stir until well blended. Add the nut oil and stir.

Bake at 350 degrees for approximately 55-60 minutes in two greased (9x5x3) loaf pans.

Cool on wire racks and freeze or refrigerate.

Hot and Sour Cabbage Salad
Adapted from Gourmet, December 2001

1 lb Savoy cabbage, thinly shredded

1 small onion, thinly sliced

1 medium carrot, shredded

1/4 cup seasoned rice vinegar

1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger

1 teaspoon sugar

1 pepper, very thinly sliced

Put cabbage and scallion in a large bowl.

Bring vinegar, ginger, and sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over moderate heat, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Pour hot dressing over cabbage, peppers, and onion, tossing to combine.
Dandelion Greens with a Kick

Adapted from recipe by TTV78
Recipe found at: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/222744/dandelion-greens-with-a-kick/

1 teaspoon salt

1 bunch dandelion greens, stems trimmed, washed well, torn into 4-inch pieces

1 teaspoon salt

1 Tablespoon olive oil

2 teaspoons butter

1/2 onion, thinly sliced

1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

2 cloves garlic, minced

salt and ground black pepper to taste

1 tablespoon grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
Soak dandelion greens in a large bowl of cold water with 1 teaspoon salt for 10 minutes. Drain.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil with 1 teaspoon salt. Cook greens until tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain and rinse with cold water until chilled.
Heat olive oil and butter in a large skillet over medium heat; cook and stir onion and red pepper flakes until onion is tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in garlic until garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds more. Increase heat to medium-high and add dandelion greens. Continue to cook and stir until liquid is evaporated, 3 to 4 minutes. Season with salt and black pepper.

Sprinkle greens with Parmesan cheese to serve.

box_111014_nonjank

Winter 2014 – November Holiday Box

WHAT’S IN THE BOX?

Red Russian Kale, Thyme, Mixed Beets, Savoy Cabbage, Carrots, Celery, Leeks,
Turnips, Garlic, Yellow Onions, Austrian Crescent Potatoes, Yellow Potatoes,
Delicata Squash, Pie Pumpkins, Honey Crisp Apples, Ornamental Gourds

 

Welcome Dear Friends to our November CSA,

This has long been one of my favorite deliveries, in part because these vegetables just taste better after a frost. I think too, that as a farmer, I have more time and energy to savor food and focus on the part of farming that I love. The air is crisp and cold, the crew is down from 25 or so to 12 or so, I get the time to check in with people, not just about the farm, but about them. We still run hard this time of year but it is a far cry from the juggernaut of the summer and fall season. I have even been frequenting the Farmers’ Market in Ballard and connecting with customers up there.

Today, I am in the office, buttoning up the final details of the coming delivery. The sun is beaming through the window that looks through our small but ancient home orchard and on to the perennial garden. Soon I will up and go out and check on the condition of the leeks, meet with the crew in the pack shed and get a broad overview of how we are coming along; harvesting under harsh conditions and washing and storing with freezing temperatures in mind.

If you glance at the contents of this box you will notice that much of what we deliver this time of year is for storage. You will also notice the foundation of an excellent holiday feast. I apologize in advance for filling your crisper drawer to overflowing, but please note that the squash, onions, potatoes, and garlic will do quite well in the garage or on the table in a basket.

The boxes are gorgeous, if I do say so myself, I just got back in. The pack crew has everything assembled and the boxes are being loaded into our refrigerated trucks; not to cool them, but rather to keep them from freezing. The colors and textures of these large boxes are amazing. It is a rare treat to have greens and roots and alliums and squash and even a bunch of fresh herbs all at once. You will see what I mean when you taste the kale and leeks, they are just a few degrees better than before the frost.

The field crew is still out harvesting leeks, and I am on to assemble the paperwork and everything else that goes into a CSA delivery. Our driver will be here at 0-dark thirty, and in a few hours you will have this produce, literally straight from the field, in your kitchen.

Enjoy!
Mike

 

summer17

Summer 2014 – Week 17

What’s in the Box:

Petite Share:
Cauliflower, Leeks, Napa Cabbage, Gold Potatoes,
Kabocha Squash, Jimmy Nardello Peppers, Eggplant,
& 1 Bouquet of Flowers.
Small shares:
Cauliflower, Leeks, Savoy Cabbage, Beans,
Gold Potatoes, Kale, Kabocha Squash,
Jimmy Nardello Peppers & 1 Bouquet of Flowers.
Family shares:
Spinach, Leeks, Beets, Savoy Cabbage, Tomatoes,
Kale, Gold Potatoes, Kabocha Squash,
Jimmy Nardello Peppers & 1 Bouquet of Flowers.

 

October 9, 2014

Please take 1 Bouquet of Flowers

Dear Friends,

While the weather has become warm and summery once again, the contents of this week’s box sing of the hearty goodness of fall.  As I write, the temperature outside is nearly 80, but I find myself thinking of all of the various soups which could be made with this week’s vegetables!  Creamy Leek and Potato, Sweet Pepper-Tomato Bisque, Hearty Cauliflower and Cabbage Soup…

While speaking of veggies, I’d like to mention two of the items you will find in your boxes.  The first is Kabocha squash.  Kabocha squash is an Asian variety of winter squash, also known as a Japanese pumpkin.  It has an exceptionally sweet flavor and can be used interchangeably with pumpkin in both sweet and savory dishes.  This squash is full of antioxidants and is surprisingly low in starch.  The seeds are also delicious roasted and salted (at 200º on a lightly oiled cookie sheet for about 20 minutes—stirred occasionally).  These are high in Omega-6 and other healthy oils, and great eaten as a snack or sprinkled on any of the soups—the ones mentioned above or in the recipes given below.

Jimmy Nardello Peppers are our other notable addition this week.  The Jimmy Nardello originated in Routi, a small coastal town in Southern Italy.  It was bred in the late 1800’s by Guisteppe Nardello who then brought this heirloom pepper to the United States.  These peppers are known for their sweet creaminess as a frying pepper, but lend their delicious flavor to any dish they are added.

In the theme of winter cooking, I would also like to remind you of our Winter Share, and especially our upcoming Holiday Boxes.  These boxes are a great way to share your appreciation of organic produce with family and friends who might not yet realize the benefits to locally and lovingly grown vegetables.  These large holiday boxes shine with the best of our harvest and speak of the quality of our produce.  It is with great honor that we offer them for your family gatherings to share with the ones you love.  Please follow the link and consider signing up for your Winter Share, which includes our Holiday Boxes in November and December, plus 10 deliveries from January through May:

http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/2014-2015-winter-share-nov-may-C5635

Thanks again and have a wonderful week!

-Emily

From Galilee – This little bouquet marks the end of the fresh flowers.  You can put it in water to be enjoyed fresh for several days.  The statice will continue to open a little.  The extend its beauty, you can then hang it up to dry as recommended for the bouquet from a few weeks ago.  Happy fall!