Winter 2016 CSA - Week 2

Winter 2016 – Week 2

What’s in the Box:

*Swiss Chard, *Kale-Purple, *Carrots , *Rutabaga, *Baking potatoes,
*Leeks, *Garlic, *Thyme, Yellow Onions (WA O), Parsnips (OR O),
Shallots (WA O), Fuji Apples (WA O), D’Anjou Pears (WA O),
Black Sheep Creamery Cheese (Adna, WA)
*grown on our farm

PLEASE TAKE ONE PACKAGE OF CHEESE.
Cheese is packed separately from your veggies to keep it cold.

Greetings from the Boistfort Valley!  The sunny weather has made me grateful and itchy to get outside and work, but the temperature fluctuations remind me of our reality.  Still, it’s nice to go out and trim back the perennials that escaped our attention during the busy seasons, soaking up a little sunshine as a side bonus.

I’ve marked all items from our farm with an asterisk (*).  The other produce is certified organic, Washington or Oregon grown.

Our cheese selection is from Black Sheep Creamery, located about 10 miles from us in Adna, Washington. Brad and Meg Gregory have owned the farm since 1992, and began making cheese over 10 years ago.  They just opened a retail store in downtown Chehalis, so if you’re in the area, stop in to say hello and to try a variety of their products.

“Bastille” cheese is aged two months and tastes young and creamy.  It is a washed curd, Sheep Cow Blend which is quite delicious.  Read more about Black Sheep Creamery, and see the sheep (and lambs!) at their website: http://blacksheepcreamery.com/

As always, if you have any questions about time or location of your delivery, please log into your account at our website or contact us at the farm.

Yours,
Heidi

 

 

 

Roasted Parsnips Recipe

Adapted from: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/roasted_parsnips/

1 1/2 pounds of parsnips, scrubbed, quartered lengthwise, cut into sticks (think French fry size)

1 generous Tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

Salt and freshly ground pepper

1/3 cup of low sodium vegetable broth
3 Tablespoons butter, softened

4 teaspoons drained, bottled horseradish (how to make homemade horseradish)

2 teaspoons finely chopped parsley or thyme (stems removed)

1 garlic clove, minced.

Pre-heat oven to 400°F. In a large roasting pan, toss the parsnips with olive oil, salt and pepper.  Add the broth, cover and roast, stirring once or twice, until the parsnips are just tender and the stock has evaporated or been absorbed, 20-30 minutes. Remove cover and allow liquid to evaporate and parsnips to brown slightly in places.  Depending on your oven, you may have to broil them briefly to avoid overcooking.

Combine the softened butter with the horseradish, parsley, chives and garlic and season with salt and pepper. Toss the warm roasted parsnips with the horseradish-herb butter and serve.

Leek and Root Vegetable Gratin
Adapted from http://www.recipe.com/leek-and-root-vegetable-gratin/

8 ounces Gruyere or Muenster cheese, shredded (2 cups)

1 Tablespoon finely chopped thyme and/or parsley

1 Tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

2 large rutabaga (about 1 lb.), peeled and thinly sliced

1 pound baking potatoes, scrubbed and thinly sliced

2-3 leeks (2 cups), cleaned and thinly sliced

1 pound large parsnips, peeled and thinly sliced (you received 1 1/2 lbs)

1 1/2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced

Assorted fresh herbs for garnish (optional)
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. In small bowl toss together cheese and chopped herbs; set aside. Coat a 3 qt. rectangular baking dish with olive oil. Layer half the turnip slices on the bottom of the dish, sprinkling salt, pepper, and 3 to 4 tablespoons the cheese mixture.  Follow with half the potato slices, half the leek slices, half the parsnip slices, and half the sweet potato slices, seasoning and adding cheese to each layer. Repeat, ending with sweet potato slices. Reserve remaining cheese mixture.

Cover with foil. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes. Remove foil. Sprinkle remaining cheese mixture over top. Increase oven temperature to 400 degrees F. Continue baking, uncovered, 15 minutes or until cheese is melted and starting to brown.

Remove from oven. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.


Pears with Bastille, Leeks and Fresh Thyme

Don’t layer your pears too much-you want them to get a little crispy around the edges.  If you don’t have the time to put this into the oven, just slice up the cheese and the pears and eat them together.

1 small leek, cleaned, stem sliced into thin coins

1 Tablespoon butter

1 medium D’Anjou pear

6-8 thin slices Black Sheep Creamery Bastille Cheese

A handful of sprigs of thyme

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Sauté the leek gently in butter, until soft and slightly browned in places, about 5 minutes. Slice the pear into thin slices (about 8 slices, keeping the odd bits to eat as you go).  Grease a glass baking dish with a bit of butter, and lay the pear slices in a single layer.  Top each pear with 1 slice of cheese and lay thyme across crosswise.  Bake, uncovered at 350 for 25 minutes, or until cheese is bubbly and pears are soft and a little crispy at the edges.  You may finish these with a quick broil to brown a bit.  (Note: thyme stems aren’t to be eaten)

December Holiday Box

Winter 2014 – December Holiday Box

What’s in the box?

Red Russian Kale, Italian Parsley, Parsnips, Rutabaga,
Mixed Beets, Rainbow Carrots, Leeks, D’ Anjou Pears,
Shallots, Garlic, Austrian Crescent Potatoes, Yellow Potatoes (Chieften),
Orange Kabocha Squash, Carnival Squash, Dried Statice

 

Welcome Dear Friends,

I am not sure what the word is to describe looking back at the newsletters from previous years to get inspiration and realizing the cyclical nature of farming; telling, revelatory, obvious… I could quite literally cross out the date on many of these and write the current date in with crayon. December’s delivery is historically just before the solstice; a time of renewal, a time of hope. These are the shortest days of the year. Depressing? Maybe, but consider this: the solstice is the turning point. Starting December 21st our days will begin to get longer: hope. Maybe the word I’m looking for is humility.

Suddenly, it seems, I have been farming for a long time. I have been here before, writing this letter in the warm office while the crew slogs through the mud, missing my daily role in the fields AND being thankful that I do not have to be out there, puzzling over what to use to fill the deliveries AND marveling at all that is still available from the farm. I remember this, each year, watching the fields get wetter and colder, watching the storage crops dwindle, witnessing the end of the season AND starting to think about the seed order. I am beginning to look back at the 2014 season AND look ahead to the 2015 season; gauge our successes and failures, assess our situation financial and otherwise AND plan for the coming year with a sense of hope and optimism.

Solstice: from the Latin for sun and ‘to stand still’. So I think we do, stand still that is, this time of year. We stand and look back and look forward, we reflect and plan.

And here is to this season bringing peace and satisfaction.

Enjoy your Solstice,

Mike

PS: there are just too many good recipes to list. I have included two of my favorites for this time of year. Our website has so many more, and they are so easy to search by ingredient. Please take advantage of these and enjoy your holiday meals!

Winter 2014 – May, week 2

What’s in the Box:

Thyme*, Mint*,
French breakfast radish,
Red potato, Red leaf  lettuce,
Fuji apples, Crimini mushrooms,
Shallots, Curly kale,
Italian  kale, Almond granola
& Peonies*
*From our farm


Please take 1 bunch of Peonies!

Dear Members,

This week brings us to our last box in the Winter CSA subscription.  We are ending on a green note with lush Curly kale, Italian kale and Red leaf lettuce.  Thank you for joining us through this past winter!!

If you haven’t yet signed up for your summer subscription, please remember to do so!  We anticipate our first summer box coming the 3rd or 4th week of June.  Be watching for our Season Opener email in the next couple of weeks, confirming the dates and drop points of this summer’s boxes.  We look forward to accompanying you through the summer season.

On the farm, we continue to transplant–eggplants today, and peppers, tomatoes, cilantro, beets and onions later this week.  Last week we planted rows of strawberries, next to the lush plants already there, full of blossoms and plump green berries.  Our strawberries should be available in mid-June, the specific dates dependent on the sunshine; we will keep you posted.

In this week’s box you will find thyme, mint, and crisp French breakfast radishes, as well as the aforementioned lettuce—bright heralds of spring harvest.  This week, we have also included Almond granola from Eat Local.  This hand-roasted granola features currents, almonds, and pumpkin seeds.

Make sure to sign up for our summer season.

http://boistfortvalleyfarm.csaware.com/store/

Enjoy your veggies and see you next month!

-Emily

Winter 2014 – April, week 1

What’s in the Box:

Bulk carrots*, Dry beans*,
Leeks*, Parsnips*,
Yellow onions, Shallots,
Russet potatoes, Collards,
Shiitake mushrooms,
Crimini mushrooms,
Baby bok choy
& Fuji apples
*From our farm

 

Dear Members,

One of the best things about our temperate climate, in my book, is how easy it is to use the outside grill all year long.  (Even when I haled from colder climes I used the grill in snowy weather but it did inspire a little head shaking from the neighbors.)  This is one of the most satisfying times to use the grill because it is often warm enough to stand outside and take in the changes to your yard and garden while being cool enough to inspire the need for a hearty warm meal.  What a coincidence that the end of winter vegetables grill and roast so beautifully!

The aroma of roasting shallots and onions may be one of the best appetizers on earth – or perhaps mixed into a skillet of collard greens to flesh out that verdant smell.  Of course, a pot of beans would go well with those greens…maybe a little cornbread?  Well, before I wander off behind my taste buds, remember, just as when you roast in the oven, the leftovers may have the best flavor, so don’t hesitate to make plenty so you have some for soups and stews and to dress up that cold weekend sandwich.

We have a little time left before all those showy above ground vegetables take center stage so fire up the grill (or the oven) and enjoy some ‘fruit of the earth’ for supper.

-Bj

Winter 2014 – February, week 2

What’s in the Box:

Carrots, Purple Carrots,
Parsnips, Leeks, Fuji apples, D’Anjou pears,
Shiitake mushrooms, Red cipollini onions,
Shallots, Red potatoes & OlyKraut sauerkraut

Dear Members,

I’d like to introduce myself as the newest member of the BVF team.  My name is Kathryn and I am the new Production Manager here.  Over the years, I have bounced back and forth between Vermont, Montana, and the Northwest.  My background is in organic vegetable and seed farming and I spent the past few years working in my home state of Vermont for an organic seed company. I’m happy to have returned to the Northwest and am busy integrating into this great place.  Rachel, Mike, and Bj have all been getting me up to speed, and I look forward to making connections with you all as well!

I’ve just returned to the office after a lovely few hours of seeding in the greenhouse.  The clouds broke every so often that it warmed up to a nice, humid 75 degrees, I’d guess.  The onions are looking tall, soft and a beautiful vibrant green while the celery, lettuces and artichokes are just beginning to show their first true leaves.  Today I seeded some of our first plantings of those cool-loving brassicas: broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, and cabbage.  These crops all have lovely, hard, round seeds that never cease to enamor me with their subtle, varying shades of purples and reds.  I love spending the time in the greenhouse to get to really examine those tiny living spheres that will turn into our shared bounty in a few short months.

The same variety of cabbage that I seeded today is also featured in your box in the form of sauerkraut from OlyKraut.  Cabbages that are best used for sauerkraut are very dense with thin leaves and a blanched interior and this variety can grow up to 12 lbs.  We grow this cabbage exclusively for OlyKraut so we are happy to, in the depths of winter, be able to include it in your CSA box. Enjoy!

Kathryn