February_week1_2015

Winter 2015 – February, Week 1

What’s in the box?

Red Russian Kale*, Parsley*, Carrots*, Rutabaga*, Garlic*, Crescent Potatoes*,
Winter Squash Surprise!*, Teggia Dry Beans*, Piñata Apples, Santa Lucia Coffee
*From our farm

 

Greeting Friends,

This week’s CSA contains some one of a kind treats with an unseasonable majority of selections grown right here on our farm!

Recent warm weather has put new growth on both our parsley and kale and we have included a bunch of each in this box. The last planting of carrots, though dwindling, is still representin’, and our potatoes are holding well in storage. You may have noticed that “squash surprise” is listed above. The surprise is that though we checked on the quality of our squash ten days ago, when we went in to pull the squash for this week’s pack we found that a majority had molded!!! A result of the perfect climate: 60degrees and 90% humidity. Everyone gets some squash, but there is no telling what variety you will receive. We used everything we had. The bad news is there is no more winter squash; the good news is there is no more winter squash.

Also included this week are two of my absolute favorites: the Piñata apple, which I believe may be my favorite fresh eating apple, and coffee from a local roaster that has actually developed a relationship with a grower in Gautemala. Read on…

Piñata isa signature apple variety, grown only by select growers and packed by Stemilt in Wenatchee. In the 1970s, researchers in Dresden-Pillnitz, Germany crossed three heirloom apples – Golden Delicious, Cox’s Orange Pippin, and Duchess of Oldenburg – to create what we now know as Piñata. The apple was released commercially throughout Europe in 1986. The Piñata apple thrives in eastern Washington’s arid climate and is quickly becoming one of the most sought-after varieties thanks to its unique tropical flavor and stellar crunch.

Santa Lucia Coffee is proud to offer a direct trade coffee from the Martinez family. Finca Vista Hermosa operates in a sustainable manner, providing social and economic support to their community. Above and below the farm are belts of virgin rain forest; dense jungles filled with an abundance of plants and animals. Coffee is planted under native shade trees, which provides ideal growing conditions and mitigates erosion. Although not certified organic, Finca Vista Hermosa uses environmentally sound practices, composting and recycling all their coffee and water waste from processing and harvesting. They use a natural fertilizer, and no chemical pesticides are used on the farm. The result is a much healthier ecosystem.

ENJOY!!!!

Mike

Winter CSA

Winter 2015 – January, Week 1

What’s in the Box:

Teggia Dry Beans*, Red Russian Kale*, Parsnips*, Carrots*
Fingerling Potato Mix*, Garlic*, Acorn Squash*, Butternut Squash*
Red D’Anjou Pears, Fuji Apples,
Black Sheep Creamery’s: Mopsie’s Best
*From our farm

Dear Friends,

I hope you all enjoyed some time with friends and family over the past two weeks. After harvest the afternoon of December 23rd, we all cleaned up our gear, whether it was a harvest knife, a field truck, or a desk, and took a nice long break. We just got back in this morning.

We returned to heavy rains. The field crew is out putting the final touches on the harvest for our deliveries this week. Bj and I are in the office sort of rearranging piles and playing a little catch up. Rachel and Maia are in the pack shed laying the foundation for this week’s deliveries.

The South Fork of the Chehalis is high and muddy, but staying within its banks. The river that bisects the farm and meanders through this Valley is largely influenced by springs and run off from the Eastern foothills of the Willipa Hills that stretch from here to the coast. If there is no snow in the hills we are relatively safe from flooding. This is not true of those rivers influenced by the Cascades. Whenever there are rains like these I spend a certain amount of time watching the river forecasts generated by NOAA: http://www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/rfc/

It’s not exactly funny cat videos on youtube, but it does give a fairly accurate projection of stream flow and gauge height of rivers and I am truly grateful for the tool. There are several local rivers that are up and over their banks, and many that have not yet peaked, but will do so tomorrow as the water drains from the upper watershed to the lower lying areas like Grand Mound and Porter. It takes almost twelve hours for the peak to reach the Centralia area from Adna near the farm, and another eight before it settle into the lower Chehalis by Ground Mound and Rochester. I can drive to Centralia in about twenty minutes. Fascinating yes?

Having been through a flood, and I could write volumes about that experience, I find myself a bit distracted and anxious whenever we get this much rain. My thoughts and prayers are with anyone that is being or might be affected by these recent rains. I am hopeful that our deliveries are not delayed, but this is not our first rodeo, and we do not anticipate any issues.

So without further ado, welcome to the first of ten January through May deliveries. You will notice the inclusion of some beautiful Eastern Washington fruit, as well as a local sheep’s cheese: Mopsie’s Best. Named after Brad and Meg’s first ewe, this is a hard cheese made with raw milk using an English recipe, and aged 6months. This cheese would pair beautifully with the pears and apples in this week’s delivery, as well as being a nice addition grated over baked or roasted squash and carrots.

Booya!
Mike

 

Teggia Beans

Teggia Beans drying in September.

Teggia beans on the vine.

Teggia beans on the vine.